2020 MoCNA Social Engagement Art Residents Selected

Feb 5, 2020

The IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (MoCNA) announces its 2020 Social Engagement Arts Residents, Anna Tsouhlarakis (Navajo/Creek/Greek) and Luzene Hill (Eastern Band of Cherokee Nation). The residency, currently funded by the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation, will bring in two residents in April of 2020. Previously this residency was funded by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and the National Museum of the American Indian. Both partnerships have offered flexibility to mold a program based on Native artist leadership and support MoCNA’s goals of activating contemporary Native Art in the community through engagement and community building.

For more information, please contact MoCNA Senior Manager of Museum Education Winoka Yepa (Diné) at (505) 428-5907 or winoka.yepa@iaia.edu.

Anna Tsouhlarakis

Anna Tsouhlarakis

Anna Tsouhlarakis

Anna Tsouhlarakis (Navajo/Creek/Greek) works in sculpture, installation, video and performance. She received her BA from Dartmouth College and MFA from Yale University. She has participated in several art residencies including Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture and Yaddo. Her work has been included in exhibitions both nationally and internationally. She has been awarded various grants and fellowships including the Eiteljorg Fellowship for Native American Contemporary Art. Her recent awards include an Artist Fellowship from the Harpo Foundation and the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities. She is the current Andrew W. Mellon Artist-in-Residence at Colorado College in Colorado Springs, CO. In the fall of 2020, she will begin a tenure track Assistant Professor position in the Art and Art History department at the University of Colorado Boulder.

Luzene Hill

Luzene Hill

Luzene Hill

Luzene Hill (Eastern Band of Cherokee Nation) is a multi-media artist, best known for socially engaged conceptual installations and performances. Her work reflects interdisciplinary scholarship in visual art, women’s studies, Native American culture topics that are integral to her background and personal journey. Through work informed by pre-contact culture of the Americas Hill advocates for Indigenous sovereignty, linguistic, cultural, and personal sovereignty. These concepts form the basis for her installations, performance, drawings and artist’s books. Recent work, employing indigenous matrilineal motifs, asserts female agency and challenges male dictated hierarchies. An enrolled member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, Hill lives and works in Atlanta, Georgia. Her work has exhibited throughout the United States, as well as in Canada, Russia, Japan, and the United Kingdom. Her awards include the 2019 Ucross Fellowship, the 2016 Native Arts and Cultures Foundation Fellowship in Visual Arts, the 2015 Eiteljorg Museum Fellowship and 2015 First Peoples Fund Fellowship. Hill’s work is featured in Susan Powers’ book, Cherokee Art: Prehistory to Present and in Josh McPhee’s book, Celebrate People’s History!: The Poster Book of Resistance and Revolution, and the PBS Documentary, Native Art NOW!.