Artist-in-Residence (A-i-R)

A-i-R Artist Rory Wakemup (Minnesota Chippewa Tribe)

A-i-R Artist Rory Wakemup (Minnesota Chippewa Tribe)

The IAIA Artist-in-Residence (A-i-R) Program hosts artists for variable-length residencies taking place on the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) campus in Santa Fe, New Mexico, during the Academic year.

Each A-i-R program provides opportunities for Native and First Nations artists to travel to the IAIA campus in Santa Fe, New Mexico, for a meaningful period of art-making and interaction with IAIA students, staff and faculty, and the Santa Fe arts community. Applicants whose work engages with cultural traditions through materials, techniques and subject matter are particularly encouraged to apply.

For this three-year cycle of residencies, IAIA will generally host 15 artists each year. The following details are consistent for each A-i-R program.

Financial Details

Housing, meal plan for one person on campus, and $200 budget for gas during residency, studio space on campus, $500 materials budget, and airfare to and from IAIA and reimbursement for a rental car, or mileage reimbursement for artists driving a personal vehicle to travel for the residency.

  • $1500: Stipend for a two-week residency (Master Artist Studio)
  • $2250: Stipend for a three-week residency (Master Artist Studio)
  • $3000: Stipend for a four-week residency (Master Artist Studio and NEA Residency)
  • $4500: Stipend for a six-week residency (Master Artist Studio, Sculpture and Foundry)
  • $6000: Stipend for the eight-week Sculpture and Foundry Residency (Sculpture and Foundry)

Artist-in-Residence Activities

Opening and closing receptions, public workshops and demonstrations, classroom visits, critique sessions with students, and events hosted by other organizations in Santa Fe. There are three types of residencies available. (Note: We are not showing the SSSR residencies on the application, therefore, there are only three types of residencies available).

Application Deadlines

The application deadline for the Spring 2019 Residencies is Midnight on Tuesday, October 23, 2018 (Central Time).

How to Apply

Fill out and submit the IAIA A-i-R application online. Need help with the online application? Contact our office at (505) 424-5713 or air@iaia.edu. We have staff available during business hours.

Studio Residencies are designed for artists working in historic Native and First Nations art forms, as well as contemporary art forms. Examples of media we are able to support are painting, drawing, beadwork, quillwork, weaving, basketry or other textile and fiber arts, installation art, jewelry, ceramics, hide and leatherwork. We also have spaces and equipment available for artists to use as a secondary part of their residency which include the Fabrication Lab (3D printing, waterjet cutter), Photography Lab, and Printmaking Studio. This residency program has the following geographic restrictions—the artist must be a tribally enrolled Native American or First Nations artist from one of the following regions:

  • Northwest (Oregon, Washington, British Columbia, Alaska, Idaho, Montana)
  • Upper Midwest (Minnesota, Wisconsin, North Dakota, South Dakota)
  • Southwest (Arizona, New Mexico, Southern California)

The geographic focus of this series of residencies is set by the grant funding source, an organization that has been gradually expanding their regional granting activities. This is the second cycle of funding and regions have expanded to include Idaho and Montana. The residencies sessions vary in length, with three-week, four-week, and six-week options.

This residency program is designed for artists working in large scale sculpture in the Allan Houser Haozous Sculpture and Foundry Building. Artists can work with cast metal, welding, wood, and stone, and combinations of sculptural materials. These residency sessions are the longest at eight-weeks to allow artists time for large projects. This residency program has the following geographic restrictions—the artist must be a tribally enrolled Native American or First Nations artist from one of the following regions:

  • Northwest (Oregon, Washington, British Columbia, Alaska, Idaho, Montana)
  • Upper Midwest (Minnesota, Wisconsin, North Dakota, South Dakota)
  • Southwest (Arizona, New Mexico, Southern California)

The geographic focus of this series of residencies is set by the grant funding source, an organization that has been gradually expanding their regional granting activities. This is the second cycle of funding and regions have expanded to include Idaho and Montana.

Applicants must be tribally enrolled in any US tribe, or Alaska Native or Native Hawaiian. These four-week residencies are designed for tribally enrolled artists from the regions not included in the other residency categories. All culturally-based art forms are eligible to apply, including visual artists, performing artists, musicians, and writers. This residency is funded by the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA).

Photographic Views

A few photographic selections from the Artist-in-Residence program.

Lara Evans

Lara Evans

(Cherokee)

Associate Dean
Academics
P (505) 424-2389
E levans@iaia.edu

Biography

Lara M. Evans is an artist, scholar, curator, and an enrolled member of the Cherokee Nation. She earned her PhD in art history at the University of New Mexico in 2005, specialization within Native American art history is contemporary art. Dr. Evans joined the Museum Studies department at IAIA in 2012 after eight years as faculty at The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington. Since 2015, Dr. Evans has also been Program Director for the IAIA Artist-in-Residence Program (A-i-R), which brings 12-14 Native American artists to campus for month-long residency sessions each year. Dr. Evans’ curatorial projects at the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Art have included Now is the Time: Investigating Native Histories and Visions of the Future (2017) and War Department: Selections from MoCNA’s Permanent Collection (2015–2016).

About IAIA

The Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) is the only four-year degree fine arts institution in the nation devoted to contemporary Native American and Alaska Native arts.

Offering undergraduate degrees in Studio Arts, Cinematic Arts and Technology, Creative Writing, Museum Studies and Indigenous Liberal Studies, and graduate degrees in Creative Writing, IAIA has graduated more than 3,800 students, and welcomes students from the 567 federally-recognized tribes and non-Native Americans looking to obtain a world-class arts education. In any given year, as many as 112 tribes are represented on campus, with about 20 percent of its student body non-Native American, adding to the vibrant cultural mix of IAIA’s diverse and welcoming students, faculty and staff.

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