Artist-in-Residence (A-i-R) Artists

The IAIA Artist-in-Residence (A-i-R) Program hosts artists for variable-length residencies taking place on the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) campus in Santa Fe, New Mexico, during the Academic year.

Each A-i-R program provides opportunities for Native and First Nations artists to travel to the IAIA campus in Santa Fe, New Mexico, for a meaningful period of art-making and interaction with IAIA students, staff and faculty, and the Santa Fe arts community.

Janet Rogers

Janet Rogers

Janet Rogers

July 3, 2018–August 31, 2018

Janet Rogers (Mohawk/Tuscarora) is a writer from Six Nations. Rogers works in the genres of poetry, spoken word performance poetry, video poetry, and recorded poetry with music. Rogers is also a radio broadcaster, documentary producer, media and sound artist. Her literary titles include Splitting the Heart, Ekstasis Editions 2007, Red Erotic, Ojistah Publishing 2010, Unearthed, Leaf Press 2011, Peace in Duress, Talonbooks 2014, and Totem Poles and Railroads, ARP Books, 2016, and a forthcoming title Between Spirit and Emotion, Bookland Press, Fall 2018. She produced and hosted Native Waves Radio on CFUV-FM from 2007–2017. Her music column, Tribal Clefs, was part of CBC Victoria’s programming from 2008–2016. Her radio documentaries, Bring Your Drum: 50 years of Indigenous Protest Music and Resonating Reconciliation, won Best Radio at the imagineNATIVE Film and Media Festival in 2011 and 2013.

The 2Ro Media Collective is a production company she and Mohawk media artist Jackson 2bears own and operate which produced the short experimental documentary NDNs on the Airwaves about CKRZ-FM Six Nations radio. 2Ro Media also developed the multiple media project For This Land presented as multi-channel media installations in several galleries and public venues. Rogers also produced a six-part radio documentary series NDNs on the Airwaves focused on the current history of native radio in Canada (launched in February 2016).

Janet Roger’s residency session is made possible by the generous support of Sunrise Springs Spa Resort in partnership with IAIA.

Robert Marcus

Robert Marcus

Robert “Spooner” Marcus

August 20, 2018–October 19, 2018

Robert “Spooner” Marcus (Ohkay Owingeh) is a glass artist. In 1993, just out of high school, his first job was working in a small glass studio in Española making juice cups. This experience as a production glass worker eventually led to his future as a glass artist. After that shop closed, he worked in a wood shop for four years. Then, in 2000, he heard of a glass shop in Taos and decided to dedicate himself to that program. Taos Glass Arts proved to be a turning point in his career. At this shop, he had the opportunity to expand his knowledge and work with other Native American glass artists. Taos Glass Arts closed it’s doors in 2005 and in 2006, he started working at Prairie Dog Glass located at Jackalope in Santa Fe. This is where he currently works producing custom and art glass. Some techniques he uses include blown and sand-carved vessels, sand castings, sculpted figures, and fused glass.

Luanne Redeye

Luanne Redeye

Luanne Redeye

September 1, 2018–October 31, 2018

Luanne Redeye (Seneca) uses painting as a way to see others. Working primarily in oil she depicts the relationship between perception and experience of native identity through genre scenes, designs, and portraits.

Born in Jamestown, New York, Redeye grew up on the Allegany Indian Reservation in Western New York. It is from here where she draws inspiration incorporating community and family members into her paintings which gives her work a strong personal and emotional component.

Redeye currently lives in Albuquerque, NM. She is an enrolled member of the Seneca Nation of Indians and the Hawk Clan. She studied at the University of New Mexico where she received her MFA in 2011. She has exhibited throughout the US and has been the recipient of various awards including, most recently, the Barbara and Eric Dobkin Fellowship at the School for Advanced Research in Santa Fe, NM.

Luanne Redeye’s residency session is made possible by the generous support of Sunrise Springs Spa Resort in partnership with IAIA.

Catherine Thompson

Catherine Thompson

Catherine “Maggie” Thompson

September 1, 2018–September 23, 2018

Catherine “Maggie” Thompson (Fond du Lac Ojibwe) was born and raised in Minneapolis, Minnesota. She received her Bachelor of Fine Arts in Textiles at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) in 2013. As a textile artist and designer, she derives inspiration from her Ojibwe heritage, family history, and through themes related to the contemporary Native American experience. Thompson’s work calls attention to its materiality by pushing the viewer’s traditional understanding of textiles. She explores materials in her work by incorporating multimedia elements such as photographs, beer caps, found objects, beadwork and 3D-printed objects.

Thompson had her first solo exhibition, entitled Where I Fit, at the All My Relations Gallery in 2014. Since then, she has exhibited at regional institutions such as the Minneapolis Institute of Art and the Plains Art Museum. In 2015, she received support from the Minnesota State Arts Board Cultural Community Partnership Grant and the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation Regional Fellowship to create a body of work for her exhibit, On Borrowed Time, which explores themes of grief around her experience of losing a parent at the Minnesota Textile Center.

In addition to her fine arts practice, Thompson runs a small knitwear business known as Makwa Studio. She is also an emerging curator of contemporary Native art and has worked on exhibitions at the Two Rivers Gallery, the McKnight Foundation, and the Minnesota Museum of American Art.

Bobby Wilson

Bobby Wilson

Bobby Wilson

September 1, 2018–September 23, 2018

Bobby Wilson (Sisseton-Wahpeton Dakota) has painted dozens of murals, performed spoken word poetry at events across the country, and appeared on television and radio numerous times. In addition to numerous artistic accomplishments, Wilson has garnered international attention as a member of the comedy group “The 1491s,” appearing on major media outlets including Comedy Central, Al Jazeera, and NPR. Wilson’s work is heavily influenced by his Dakota heritage combined with a lifelong city upbringing. Much of his work strives to convey a social and political message, tackling issues of racism, homelessness, and imperialism while maintaining a sense of humor and hope. He was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota and is currently based in Tucson, Arizona.

Lillian Pitt

Lillian Pitt

Lillian Pitt

September 17, 2018–September 28, 2018

Lillian Pitt (Wasco/Warm Springs/Yakama) was born on the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, Wasco and Paiute Reservation in 1943. She is known internationally for her masks of clay, bronze, and cast glass, along with her sculpture, jewelry, and prints—which honor her ancestors from the Columbia River Gorge.

Pitt has been the lead teacher for the Culture Bearers for the Confluence Project and has now retired to head the Lillian Pitt Education Fund. Currently, she is on the Fisher’s Memorial Task Force which is working to have a sculpture built to help fishers be safe when they are on the rivers and to honor the fishers who have vanished in the rivers. Pitt lives and works in Portland, Oregon.

Katie Dorame

Katie Dorame

Katie Dorame

September 26, 2018–October 20, 2018

Katie Dorame (Gabrielino/Tongva) is a visual artist born in Los Angeles, currently living and working in Oakland, California. Dorame creates paintings and drawings filled with actors, film scenes, props, and costumes—building her own directorial vision. Her work offers a perspective outside of conventional blockbusters, twisting classic, contemporary, and b-movies into other worlds.

Challenging Hollywood’s typecasting and depictions of Indigenous actors and other actors of color by recasting, re-working roles and using genres, both film and art historical, to question cinema’s romanticized views of the past that have persisted.

Dorame’s work has been exhibited nationally at various galleries including Shulamit Nazarian, Southern Exposure, Galería de la Raza, Incline Gallery, the Thacher Gallery at the University of San Francisco and the Handwerker Gallery at Ithaca College in New York. She received her MFA from California College of the Arts and her BA from the University of California, Santa Cruz. She is an Indigenous artist of mixed descent and member of the Gabrielino/Tongva tribe of California.

Monty Little

Monty Little

Monty Little

October 3, 2018–November 5, 2018

After five semesters of studying architecture at Arizona State University, Monty Little (Diné) enlisted in the Marine Corps as a Rifleman in 2004. During his enlistment, Little was stationed with 2nd Battalion, 5th Marines and served as a fire team leader while deployed in Iraq for seven months. In 2008, Little was Honorably Discharged from the Marine Corps.

Following his service, Little graduated with a BFA from the IAIA in 2015, with a double major—Creative Writing and Studio Arts. It was at IAIA where he began to translate his thoughts on his experience of war and post-war. Little visualizes his written work of anomalistic images of war, past and current memories, and employs a disarray of images that interstice uncertainty. Placement is indirect, yet strict, but not predictable-he finds clarity to be marginal. Little began to paint and print his poems using each medium as erasure, where unsettling truths reveal personal components and texture is integral, yet disruptive, to finding his past chaotic.

Little’s current body of work re-conceptualizes various Edward S. Curtis photographs in which the Indigenous portraits are renegotiated in a distorted lens. Meaning, Curtis’s nostalgic portraits are presently an illusion, whereas, the impact of modernity, assimilation, and complex identity now distort contemporary Indigeneity. He is interested in renovating Curtis’s photographs by investigating irregularity in portraiture, where he uses glazing and alla prima techniques to paint his photos surreal. He continues to explore the discourse of perception in relationship to traditional and contemporary Indigenous identity. Little currently lives and works in Tulsa, Oklahoma with his family.

Adrian Wall

Adrian Wall

Adrian Wall

October 21, 2018–December 15, 2018

Adrian Wall (Jemez Pueblo) is a sculptor, and he has been sculpting since his late teens and has always had an affinity towards stone sculpture. Wall received his BFA from IAIA in 2014.

While Wall’s primary medium is stone, he works with many materials, including clay, bronze, and glass. He has won several major awards in sculpture competitions across the United States and is a member of the Indigenous Sculptors Society, an accomplished group of Native American Sculptors dedicated to the advancement of stone sculpture. His work can be found in the collections of the Eiteljorg Museum, the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center Museum, and the Hauku Museum.

Wall has been the recipient of several fellowships including the National Museum of the American Indian Visiting Artist Fellow, the School for Advanced Research Rollin and Mary Ella King Native Artist Fellowship, and the Southwest Association for Indian Arts Fellowship. The subjects of Wall’s sculptures most often relate to his Pueblo heritage. Stylistically, Wall is well known for blending figurative detail with abstract forms.

Kenneth Johnson

Kenneth Johnson

Kenneth Johnson

October 30, 2018–December 30, 2018

Kenneth Johnson (Musogee Creek/Seminole) is a custom jewelry designer who is quick to smile and is known for his attention to detail in his jewelry creations. He specializes in stamp work, repoussé, and engraving precious metals using Southeastern Native motifs.

He also enjoys using his experience in the arts and organizing talent for community development projects such as the ongoing Mvskoke Canoe Paddle Project and, in the past, the Santa Fe Indian Market collaborative concho belt, silverware, and necklace projects.

Raised in Oklahoma, Johnson is from the Muscogee (Creek) and Seminole tribes, and has received recognition for creating iconic commissions for U.S., Canadian, and Oklahoma Supreme Court Justices, U.S. Congressmen, Native American Tribal Chiefs, museums, and distinguished individuals.

He is a former Southwestern Association for Indian Arts Board Member, is currently Chair of the Mvskoke Arts Association, and is a new Board member of the Ralph T. Coe Center for the Arts in Santa Fe. Johnson currently makes his home and art in Santa Fe, New Mexico. His residency is generously supported by the National Endowment for the Arts.

TahNibaa Naataanii

TahNibaa Naataanii

TahNibaa Naataanii

October 30, 2018–December 11, 2018

TahNibaa Naataanii (Navajo) is of the Many Hogan Clan and born for the Coyote Pass Clan. Her maternal and paternal grandfathers are the Mexican Clan and the Steep Rock Clan. She is from Table Mesa and Toadlena, New Mexico.

As a young girl, her paternal grandmother gave her the Navajo name TahNibaa Aglohiigiih. When translated it means TahNibaa the Weaver. Navajo Weaving was introduced to her by her mother, Sarah H. Natani, when she was seven years of age and in the second grade. She learned how to weave stripes first, then graduated to weaving squares and diamonds. Naataanii wove throughout her teenage years, and after she graduated from high school, her weaving ceased for a moment as she joined the U.S. Navy. After her Naval tour, she longed to hear the tapping of the weft and, shortly after, began to weave once again. She is discovering that she is falling in love with her work each day.

Naataanii enjoys raising sheep, working with raw and processed wool, enjoys weaving traditional-style Shoulder Blankets, contemporary designs, and exploring the creative process. When she weaves, she feels the wisdom of her Great Matriarchs and “Asdzaa Maaiideeshgiizhnii” who make her a 5th generation weaver.

Melanie Talmadge Sainz

Melanie Talmadge Sainz

Melanie Talmadge Sainz

November 1, 2018–December 13, 2018

Melanie Talmadge Sainz (Ho-Chunk) art is a reflection of the creative inspiration and mentoring from generations past. Sainz equally credits her formal art instruction and her tribe’s encouragement to uphold cultural preservation through the arts. Her work exemplifies elements of her people as an adaptive culture. Among Sainz’s favorite materials are porcupine quills combined with traditional and adapted techniques and materials that she has discovered, collected, processed, and integrated into her work. Long before the arrival of the European explorers and traders in Wisconsin, her Ho-Chunk ancestors were using materials that nature provided to adorn themselves, their clothing, and their surroundings. In Ho-Chunk, Sainz says that they do not possess the word for “art,” but that they do understand the importance of beauty in the connection to the natural world.

Sainz was an art educator in public and private schools and art museums for thirty years. Although she stepped away from full-time teaching status, her art career is now balanced between creating, exhibiting, and teaching art with emerging Native artists in the Great Lakes area to achieve their goals.

“My art keeps me centered—it is my therapy. I find comfort and peace with my art. While engaged in art making, I often think of my conincaaga (grandmother) Rose Whiterabbit Miner and my naani (mother) Bernadine Miner Talmadge. They were talented artists and successful entrepreneurs. I thank them for their love, influence, time, and patience as they were my first art teachers and they continue to be my role models” says Sainz. For Sainz, art allows her to continue to tell a story with an authentic voice and she believes that her commitment to her cultural art forms will strengthen the creative culture of Ho-Chunk people.

Meghann O’Brien

Meghann O’Brien

March 7–May 1, 2018

Meghann O’Brien (Cape Mudge/ Kiusta/Haida Gwaii/Irish) is a Northwest Coast weaver working in the traditions of basketry, Yeil Koowu (Raven’s Tail) and Naaxiin (Chilkat) textiles. She is descended from the Kwakwaka’wakw village of Weḵaʼyi Tʼsakwaʼlutan (Cape Mudge), the village of Kiusta, Haida Gwaii, and Dublin, Ireland. Her name in the Kwakwala language is Kwaxhi’laga—“Smoke Coming Out of the Top of the Big House, Welcoming People to Feast and Potlatch.” In the Haida language she carries the name of her maternal great grandmother Ruby Simeon, Jaad Kuujus—“Dear Woman.” O’Brien has apprenticed under master weavers and traditional teachers Kerri Dick, Sherri Dick, and William White. Her artistic process is one of devotion to the highest expression of the art form, preferring to allow the weaving to find its own place in the world once completed. Her work is distributed between public and private galleries, museums, collectors, family, chiefs, dancers, and ceremonial people. She travels globally to lecture and demonstrate.

Wayne Nez Gaussoin

February 19–April 18, 2018

Wayne Nez Gaussoin

Wayne Nez Gaussoin

Wayne Nez Gaussoin (Navajo/Picuris Pueblo), the youngest of three sons, of renown Jeweler Connie Tsosie Gaussoin. Following a family tradition, his mother and older brother David, have taught him basics of silversmithing. He has since taken courses at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, finished his Bachelor of Fine Arts at the Institute of American Indian Arts, and has currently completed a Master of Fine Arts with a Minor in Museum Studies from The University of New Mexico.

Gaussoin’s interest in art not only focuses on jewelry, but also includes media such as sculpture and installation art. His style merges his own design from modern influences and incorporates traditional ideas and techniques. Gaussoin similarly sustains the integrity of the past while building a new future in his work. Each work is thoughtfully rendered, representing artistic purity while creating a new global arena of Native creativity and expression. His artistic works are likewise experiential and expressive. Such ideas are displayed in his traditional techniques in tufa casts to his multimedia installations.

He continues to sell his work through selected juried art shows, such as the Museum of Art and Design in New York City, and galleries nationally and internationally. He also has participated in lectures and artist-in-residencies for both his jewelry and sculpture work. Gaussoin also has an extensive background in teaching jewelry and art theory, where he was last teaching foundations as a TA at the University of New Mexico. Also, his recent experience of being accepted into the Land Arts of the American West program at the University of New Mexico has highly influenced his current direction of work where he plans to explore the ideas and relationships between pop culture and his own tribal traditional mythologies.

Marwin Begaye

March 15–April 12, 2018

Marwin Begaye is an internationally exhibited printmaker, painter, and nationally recognized graphic designer. As Associate Professor of Painting and Printmaking at the University of Oklahoma’s School of Visual Arts, his research has concentrated on issues of cultural identity, especially the intersection of traditional American Indian culture and pop culture. He also has conducted research in the technical aspects of relief printing and the use of mixed media, particularly in printmaking processes. His work has been exhibited nationally across the US and internationally in New Zealand, Argentina, Paraguay, Italy, Siberia, and Estonia. He has received numerous awards, including the Oklahoma Visual Artists Coalition Fellowship, First Place at the Red Earth Festival, Best in Category in Contemporary Painting at the Gallup Inter-Tribal Indian Ceremonial, Best of Category in Graphics, and, most recently, Best of Division in Graphics at the 2017 Santa Fe Indian Market. Begaye has been featured in many publications and is represented by Exhibit C in Oklahoma City, Rainmaker Gallery, Bristol, England, and Indian Summer Gallery in Saugatuck, MI. Begaye lives in Norman, Oklahoma, as a captive of his wife’s Chickasaw Nation community.

Monte Yellow Bird, Sr.

March 24–April 26, 2018

Monte Yellow Bird, Sr. is a member of the Arikara/Hidatsa nations and better known in the art world as Black Pinto Horse. He is devoted to a positive expression of the harmonic balance between humanity and nature. A descendant of prominent Arikara and Hidatsa chiefs, Son of the Star and Youngbird, he is driven by the importance to maintain, educate, and share the traditions and memories of family visually through mixed media and ledger art.

Black Pinto Horse is best known for Ledger Art or Warrior Art, a historic, transitional expression from the 1800’s demonstrated by Northern and Southern Plains tribes. As a child, he was first influenced by the family’s first black-and-white TV, drawing images of the Vietnam War.

An IAIA Alumni in the late 70’s High School program, he went on to attend NDSU, majoring in History Education and receiving his BFA from Minot State University. In addition to academic studies, Black Pinto Horse has invested over 35 years to youth and communities across the country from public art projects, classroom teaching, mentoring, and martial arts instruction.

In 2017, Black Pinto Horse traveled to Abu Dhabi, chosen as Master Artist at the Art Hub. He has won multiple awards at major markets such as Autry Museum in Los Angeles, Heard Museum in Phoenix, SWAIA in Santa Fe, and the Eiteljorg in Indianapolis. In August 2014, he was awarded the SWAIA Residency Fellowship in Santa Fe.

Ian Kuali’i

March 24–April 26, 2018

Ian Kuali’i (Native Hawaiian/Apache) is a full-time multi-disciplinary artist born in Orange County, California, raised on Maui, Hawaii. He currently resides in the San Francisco Bay Area. The cultural revolution of Hip Hop initially influenced Kuali’i’s style and subject matter and eventually he moved New York City where he began his East Coast pilgrimage to the roots of the graffiti art movement. In time, he connected with legendary graffiti artists such as, Mare139 and Doze Green, under whom he served as an apprentice for seven years. Kuali’i developed his artistic style under Doze Green’s mentorship.

While trying to simplify his technique as a graffiti writer, Kuali’i discovered stenciling and realized that he appreciated the “cut” more than the spray, thus finding his preferred medium—hand-cut paper. He describes his creative practice as “the meditative process of destroying to create.” His portraits, journal entries, and scenes are carefully rendered from a single sheet of paper using only an exacto knife. His work is a balance between the rough and the delicate, exploring ideas of modern progress, biodiversity, and the foundation of personal history. He has been working on fine-tuning his direct cut method on large-scale public mural work and also experimenting with new technology such as laser cutting and 3D printing. Kuali’i is working to incorporate Hawaiian traditional arts, such as tapa-making, as part of his art practice, creating a hybrid of traditional and contemporary.

Kuali’i has created one-of-a-kind, site-specific art pieces for events and programs at Honor the Earth, Wall\Therapy, UrbanArt Biennale 2017, Universal Pictures, deYoung Museum, National Museum of Mexican Art, National Trust for Historic Preservation, and Friends of Miami Marine Stadium.

Orlando Dugi

January 8–March 8, 2018

Orlando Dugi

Orlando Dugi

Orlando Dugi (pronounced dew-guy) is currently living and working in Santa Fe, NM. Originally from Grey Mountain, Arizona, Diné Nation, Dugi learned to bead at the age of six and learned how to sew in a home economics class in seventh grade. In 2009, Dugi began designing hand-beaded evening clutches and designed his first gown in 2010. The following year Dugi designed his first capsule collection of only three garments each hand-beaded and hand-sewn. Within the last four years, Dugi has designed three collections and includes a New York City showing at NY Style Fashion Week in 2016 Spring and Summer. Dugi’s designs are feminine, sculptural, and highly embellished with many hours of hand-sewing and hand-beading and therefore they are only made-to-order.

Orlando Dugi is currently working on his 2018 Fall and Winter collection. You can see the making of the collection during his IAIA Artist-in-Residence (A-i-R) residency. After the A-i-R residency, Dugi will begin working on his 2019 Spring and Summer collection which will be shown at Style NY Fashion Week in September 2018.

Christa Cassano

February 15–February 26, 2018

Christa Cassano

Christa Cassano

Christa Cassano (Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Arrow Lakes Band) is a visual artist and storyteller living in Philadelphia, PA. Her work has been exhibited internationally and explores themes of alienation, violence, and insurgence, often with depictions of animals as human stand-ins as a way to mark aspects of society’s complex and many times absurd relationship to nature. In 2016, she was nominated for an Eisner Comics Industry Award for co-adapting John Leguizamo’s One Man HBO Show, Ghetto Klown, into a graphic novel, and has contributed political cartoons to the RESIST! Newsletter distributed at the Women’s March on Washington 2017 and the comix anthology A.P.B. (Artists against Police Brutality).

She has been a 2016 Artist-in-Residence at Yaddo and a 2012 Associate Artist at the Atlantic Center for the Arts, which prompted a focus away from fine art into comics making. Cassano received scholarships and classical training from Cooper Union School of Art and The Art Students League of NY, is a two-time Lloyd Sherwood Grant recipient, and winner of the EspoArte2003 Award for Excellence in Contemporary Art, among others. She is currently writing and drawing her own graphic series.

Micheal Two Bulls

January 15–February 17, 2018

Micheal Two Bulls

Micheal Two Bulls

Micheal Two Bulls (Oglala Lakota) is from the Rapid City and Red Shirt Table communities located on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Through printmaking, Two Bulls combines several processes into one piece, creating one-of-a-kind mixed media works on paper. His work often focuses on concepts that deal with identity, history, and place. Lakota symbols and iconography meshed with popular culture imagery blend together in his work, often asking the audience to engage and ask questions. Two Bulls writes, “I want my paintings to start a dialogue with the viewer, engage them on various levels where they can ask questions, be curious, and empathize with the work.”

Wade Patton

January 12–February 10, 2018

Wade Patton

Wade Patton

The spare beauty of the prairie resonates in Wade Patton’s work. An enrolled member of the Oglala Lakota, Patton grew up on the Pine Ridge reservation surrounded by a rich culture of music and art. After obtaining a BA in art from Black Hills State University and a solo exhibit at the Sioux Indian Museum in Rapid City, he moved to the East Coast. It took leaving South Dakota for Patton to find his voice for his most recent body of work. Patton began expressing what he missed, the beauty and splendor of the Black Hills and the skies of South Dakota. He started to draw landscapes and clouds as a reminder of home. Something clicked, not only in his artistic expression, but with collectors and galleries—their positive response was unexpected. Patton started sending work back home for exhibits and to galleries, and began getting recognition. Yet, while pursuing art opportunities on the East Coast, he longed for home. Recently, Patton realized how much he needed to return to South Dakota. He missed his family and needed to pursue his art in the place where he finds the most inspiration. That decision brought Patton straight back into the thriving Native Art scene that wasn’t there when he left South Dakota three years ago. Native artists we’re doing what was expected, but once he returned it was a breath of fresh air to see that Native artists were taking risks and were being accepted in mainstream society.

Now, Patton says people in his community remark, “Oh you’re the cloud guy!” Patton is reacquainting himself with the land and his ancestry, which is most prevalent in his new works. Patton’s establishing a style of his own and there’s nothing like it right now in the Indian art world.” —Artist Don Montileaux on Wade Patton’s most recent work.

November 6–December 6, 2017

Athena LaTocha

Athena LaTocha

Athena LaTocha

Athena LaTocha (Hunkpapa Lakota/Keweenaw Bay Ojibwe), born in Anchorage, Alaska, is an artist whose monumental works on paper explore the tenuous relationship between man-made and natural landscapes. Her work has been shown across the country in places such as the CUE Art Foundation, Artist’s Space, Wilmer Jennings Gallery, Chelsea Art Museum, New York State Museum, the Dahl Art Center in South Dakota, the South Dakota Art Museum, and the International Gallery of Contemporary Art in Anchorage, Alaska. Most recently, she had a solo exhibition at the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (MoCNA) in Santa Fe, 2017.

LaTocha received her Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and a Master of Fine Arts degree from Stony Brook University, New York. LaTocha is a 2016 recipient of the Joan Mitchell Foundation Painters and Sculptors Grant. Additionally, she was awarded the prestigious Robert Rauschenberg Foundation Residency in 2013. The artist held a full fellowship at the Vermont Studio Center, and was the artist-in-residence at Chashama at the Brooklyn Army Terminal in New York from 2008 to 2015. Currently she divides her time between New York City and Peekskill, New York.

Frank Buffalo Hyde

Frank Buffalo Hyde

Frank Buffalo Hyde

Frank Buffalo Hyde (Nez Perce/Onondaga Nation, Beaver Clan) was born and presently resides in Santa Fe, New Mexico. He uses American icons to explore the miscommunication of cultures. Hyde often turns stereotypical imagery of the “Indian” on its ear with his own brand of satire. Over the past decade he has had numerous sold out shows and his work has been collected by many American museum and public art collections. In 2013, a suite of thirteen paintings titled, SKNDNS-Native Americans on Film, was purchased by The National Museum of the American Indian. Buffalo Hyde has shown internationally including a summer and fall 2012 exhibition of contemporary art in Russia and in galleries in Japan, Chicago, New York, and San Francisco. He has been an artist-in-residence and exhibited at the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (MoCNA) in Santa Fe and at the University of Virginia’s Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection. His most recent solo exhibition, I-Witness Culture is at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, February 2017 to January 2018. Buffalo Hyde attended IAIA in 1993–1995 and the Santa Fe Art Institute in 1996.

Jason Reed Brown

Jason Reed Brown

Jason Reed Brown

Jason Reed Brown (Koyukon Athabascan) is a blacksmith artist who was raised between the urban and rural landscapes of both the Pacific Northwest and Alaska. Living in the Alaskan wilderness produced memories of the land and family, a contrast to life in the city. His designs come from a desire to combine his lifetime of exposure to Northwest Coastal art and city lifestyle. The artist involves the principle of “translating” Northwest Coastal Native art into the medium of metal through the principles of blacksmithing. His sculptures are hammered into shape then bent, riveted, and welded together. Previous to attending the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA), Brown worked as a tattoo artist and muralist. While at IAIA, Brown discovered a passion for sculpture, specifically metal sculpture. During the summer of 1998, Brown assisted world-renowned blacksmith artist Tom Joyce on various projects including the Albuquerque art museums’ Rio Grande Art Gates. His experience working with Joyce was a critical factor in his understanding of utilizing iron as an artistic medium. Brown graduated in 2001 from Turley Forge School of Blacksmithing.

Wanesia Spry Misquadace

Wanesia Spry Misquadace

Wanesia Spry Misquadace

Wanesia Misquadace currently resides in Awahtukee, Arizona where she lectures and teaches as an Assistant Professor of Metals and Indigenous Arts, and she is head of the Metals Program at Arizona State University. Misquadace is from the Fond Du Lac Ojibway band, an enrolled member of the Minnesota Lake Superior Chippewa Tribe. Misquadace earned her MFA in Metals and 4-Dimensional Art in 2015 at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Misquadace was the first Native American student to show her work at the Chazen Museum while attending graduate school in a three-year traveling exhibit called, “Changing Hands 3: Art Without Reservation,” Museum of Art and Design, New York. Misquadace pushed forward to become one of the first four graduates to received her BFA in Museum Studies and Studio Arts in 2005 from the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Misquadace is a master at the art of birch-bark biting, a traditional art form to which she gives a contemporary context using the patterns as templates for jewelry, dresses, birch bark baskets, quill work, and storytelling. She awakened the art form in 2005 where she received her first blue ribbon in diverse art forms at the prestigious Santa Fe Indian Art Market, The Heard Museum, Gene Autry and Native Treasures. Misquadace creates a new style of birch bark fine art baskets with wood biting techniques, metal transfers, and precious stones. Misquadace says, “I love my people, I love the process of connecting my heart, my designs my feelings into each piece I create. My research explores metal smithing as a subject and object engaging the fields history methods outcomes while exploring indigenous native techniques that provoke new conversations. We are Here. We are interconnected.”

October 4–November 4, 2017

Erica Lord

Erica Lord

Erica Lord

Erica Lord (Athabaskan) is an interdisciplinary artist who explores concepts and issues that exist within a contemporary Indigenous experience and how culture and identity are affected in a rapidly changing world. Lord draws on her experience of growing up between Alaska and Upper Michigan and her mixed race cultural identity drawn from her Athabaskan, Iñupiat, Finnish, Swedish, Japanese, and English descent. In order to address a multiple or mixed identity, Lord uses a variety of mediums to construct new, ambiguous, or challenging representations of race. Lord received her BA from Carleton College, and a MFA at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She has exhibited nationally and internationally, including the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (MoCNA) in Santa Fe, the Musée du Quai Branley in Paris, the National Gallery of Canada, and the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian.

Peter Williams

Peter Williams

Peter Williams

Peter Williams (Yup’ik) who was born and based in Alaska, strives to express and celebrate the oneness of all things, with emphasis on the human spiritual relationship with nature. He views this connection in his art as vital for healing the human soul along with the well-being of the planet. Williams smudges with Labrador Tea before a hunt, praying for safety and clean kills. He asks the animals for their lives before he shoots while giving them their last drink of water prior to skinning. Meat is a large part of his diet, a gift he shares with his community. The artist views these acts to honor the animals enabling their spirits to visit again. He has demonstrated the technique of skin sewing seal and sea otter fur by hand at Southeast Alaska Indian Cultural Center, Sheldon Jackson Museum, Alaska State Museum, and to Alaska Native youth. Each stitch binds the human world closer to the animal world.

Under his fashion label Shaman Furs, Williams carries on the historic art of elegant and simple textile construction built to endure the Alaskan elements. The artist views fashion as telling a complex story in the simplest way. In 2015 he presented at New York Fashion Week and was profiled in The Guardian. His first runway show was at Brooklyn Fashion Week, 2016. Later that year, the New York Times chief fashion critic, Vanessa Friedman, published an article on his work titled “Is All Fur Bad Fur?”. Williams completed a Rasmuson Foundation Artist Residency at Santa Fe Art Institute, and has guest lectured at Yale University, Portland Art Museum, and 516 ARTS.

Ryan Feddersen

Ryan Feddersen

Ryan Feddersen

Ryan Feddersen (Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Okanogan and Arrow Lakes) is a Seattle-based artist who creates multi-layered environments and interactive sculptures alongside intimate studio work. Her art is tongue-in-cheek, with a pointed message by providing opportunities for a re-examination of shared histories through humor and fun, and hands-on engagement. Hypocrisies and injustices in contemporary American culture in regard to race, class, and gender—through a historical, cultural, and urban lens are often addressed in her work. Feddersen received a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Cornish College of the Arts in 2009, graduating Magna Cum Laude with concentrations in painting, print art, drawing, and sculpture. She has created large-scale interactive installations and site-specific pieces for regional museums and arts agencies including the Seattle Office of Arts and Culture, Tacoma Art Museum, MoPOP(EMP), The Henry Gallery, Spokane Arts, and the Missoula Art Museum.

September 1–30, 2017

Janice George

Janice George

Janice George

Janice George (Chepx imiya Siyam), from Squamish Nation, Canada, is a master weaver and textile artist who learned to weave from Coast Salish weaver Susan Pavel and Subiyay-t Bruce Miller of Skokomish in 2003. George has integrated Squamish teachings into her work from her late Grandmother Kwitelut-t Lena Jacobs and other Squamish ancestors. George states, “In this short time of my weaving life, a few of my mentors have left this earth. Their breath is carried on in the teachings I pass on. I feel and see the pride that comes from reclaiming our inheritance from our elders and ancestors when we weave and when we wear our beloved weavings. We are taught spiritual protection is part of what we are wearing and feel the love that is put in each hand movement it takes to make a robe.” George co-authored the book Salish Blankets, Robes of Protection and Transformation, Symbols of Wealth with Willard Joseph and Leslie H. Tepper. For the last twelve years, the artist has been teaching her textile skills across Salish speaking territory. She attended Capilano University, British Columbia, the Institute of American Indian Arts, Santa Fe, and interned at the Canadian Museum of History, Quebec.

Leanne Campbell

Leanne Campbell

Leanne Campbell

Leanne Campbell is an enrolled member of the Coeur d’Alene Tribe or Schitsu’umsh—meaning, “Those who were found here” or “The Discovered People.” Her lineage includes the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation located in central Washington and the Nez Perce Tribe of Idaho. Campbell embraces her history, culture, language, and traditions while being a speaker of the Schitsu’umsh language. She is most renowned for her unique skills in traditional and cultural arts with beadwork and basketry. Her beadwork is a mix of pictorial, geometric designs, and old style floral designs of the Northwest Columbia Plateau. Campbell gained valuable experience and knowledge by working over the past twenty-four years with the Coeur d’Alene Tribe. Currently, Campbell serves as the Historic Preservation Program Manager and Curator for the Coeur d’Alene Tribe. She earned her Bachelor of Fine Arts in Museum Studies with a minor in Studio Arts at the Institute of American Indian Arts, Santa Fe, and is a United States Air Force veteran of the Desert Shield and Desert Storm era.

Marlene Ann Nielsen

Marlene Ann Nielsen

Marlene Ann Nielsen

Marlene Ann Nielsen is Yupik from Kokhanok, Alaska, located on the south shore of Lake Iliamna. This is the largest lake in Alaska and contains several species of fish that spawn yearly. From a young age she has helped to preserve, smoke, and salt sockeye salmon for winter use. Nielsen is self-taught in the art of making baskets, wallets, and jewelry with sockeye salmon skin. She experienced trial and error on learning how to preserve fish skin. Salmon skin art was seen as a lost skill in her area which inspired her to reintroduce the rare technique by teaching students. Nielsen has been creating art with fish skin since 2002.

March 30–April 28, 2017

Ka’ila Farrell-Smith

Ka’ila Farrell-Smith

Ka’ila Farrell-Smith

Ka’ila Farrell-Smith (Klamath/Modoc) is focused on channeling research into a creative flow of experimentation and artistic playfulness that is rooted in Indigenous aesthetics and abstract formalism. Ka’ila is a contemporary Klamath and Modoc visual artist based in Portland, Oregon. She works as an art mentor and teacher and is a co-director for Signal Fire and One Flaming Arrow: Inter-tribal Art, Music, and Film Festival. Ka’ila was awarded a Ford Family Fellowship and a Regional Arts and Culture Council Professional Development grant to attend a 2015 Caldera Artist-In-Residence and a 2016 Djerassi Resident Artist Program.

Ka’ila has also attended the Rainmaker Residency and Signal Fire’s Wide Open Studios. She has work in the permanent collection of the Portland Art Museum and has exhibited at the Archer Gallery, Vancouver City Hall, Washington History Museum, Museum of Northwest Art, Missoula Art Museum, and the Tacoma Art Museum. Ka’ila Farrell-Smith received a BFA from Pacific Northwest College of Art in 2004 and an MFA in Contemporary Art Practices Studio from Portland State University in 2014.

Watch a short video segment from Oregon Public Broadcasting featuring Ka’ila Farrell-Smith.

Anthony Lovato

Anthony Lovato

Anthony Lovato

Anthony Lovato (Santo Domingo Pueblo) is the son of notable lapidary artist Mary Coriz Lovato and grandson of Santiago Leo Coriz. Lovato, fifth-generation Pueblo of Santo Domingo, employs unique tufa-cast and fabricated jewelry that bridges both traditional and contemporary styles. It also conveys great presence, while reflecting his family’s creative legacy as well as Santo Domingo’s religious heritage.

“I really come from a traditional jewelry family,” says Lovato. His mother, Mary, raised him and his four brothers to become accomplished silversmiths. Lovato also learned from his father, Sedelio F. Lovato, a metalworker who did both casting and inlay work. Most of his learning came from his grandfather, Santiago Leo Coriz, who was skilled in tufa-casting.

Lovato is known for his fantastic jewelry and metalwork formed by tufa-casting. He makes pendants, bracelets, necklaces, and even large hollow-ware jars using this method. Lovato has received numerous awards over the years for his work. He stresses quality in his work and comments that he strives to, “make it perfect and right the first time.”

February 24–March 24, 2017

John Hagen

John Hagen

John Hagen (Aleut/Inupiaq) is a landscape photographer who lives in Haines, AK. His inspiration is people and place and the interaction between the two. As an Alaska Native born and raised outside his traditional homeland, he explores place and how it relates to identity.

A Inupiaq photographer, Hagen explores the kind of images humans create about themselves. In a modern world, everyone uses cameras. But Hagen’s inspiration for creating images may be similar to the inspirations in nature his ancestors used—and generations beyond may also use—to connect with their identity and their place. Hagen creates a body of work that explores these questions.

In his most recent work, Hagen has been seeking out inspirations for Indigenous art and designs in nature. The end result is abstract landscape photographs. Rather than focus on the sweeping Alaska landscape, Hagen may choose to photograph a single crack in the ice or the curves of a river—shapes that may have influenced his ancestors in their art or designs.

Hagen has shown his work in Alaska, Washington, Oklahoma, and Santa Fe. He is the recent recipient of an artist award from the Rasmuson Foundation and a Connie Boochever Artist Fellowship.

Craig Dan Goseyun, photograph by Rosalie Favell

Craig Dan Goseyun, photograph by Rosalie Favell

Craig Dan Goseyun

Craig Dan Goseyun (San Carlos Apache) served as an apprentice to Allan Houser in the late 1980s. Goseyun is known for his monumentally scaled Apache Mountain Spirit Dancers executed in stone and bronze. His sculptures are based on his tribal culture and are in the collections of major museums, universities, schools, hospitals, tribal centers, and private collectors. Goseyun is an IAIA alumnus, having attended during two different time periods—the 1980s and during 2010–2012. Goseyun lived in Santa Fe for 32 years and currently resides on the San Carlos Apache Reservation.

January 19–February 17, 2017

Meghann O’Brien

Meghann O’Brien

Meghann O’Brien (Cape Mudge/ Kiusta/Haida Gwaii/Irish) is a Northwest Coast weaver working in the traditions of basketry, Yeil Koowu (Raven’s Tail) and Naaxiin (Chilkat) textiles. She is descended from the Kwakwaka’wakw village of Weḵaʼyi Tʼsakwaʼlutan (Cape Mudge), the village of Kiusta, Haida Gwaii, and Dublin, Ireland. Her name in the Kwakwala language is Kwaxhi’laga—“Smoke Coming Out of the Top of the Big House, Welcoming People to Feast and Potlatch.” In the Haida language she carries the name of her maternal great grandmother Ruby Simeon, Jaad Kuujus—“Dear Woman.” O’Brien has apprenticed under master weavers and traditional teachers Kerri Dick, Sherri Dick, and William White. Her artistic process is one of devotion to the highest expression of the art form, preferring to allow the weaving to find its own place in the world once completed. Her work is distributed between public and private galleries, museums, collectors, family, chiefs, dancers, and ceremonial people. She travels globally to lecture and demonstrate.

Fritz Casuse

Fritz Casuse

Fritz Casuse (Navajo) is an award-winning jeweler known for his highly complex handcrafted masterpieces. He is also a sculptor and brings this expertise to his jewelry-making, creating highly dimensional and textured jewelry pieces that are fluid and full of movement. Casuse was inspired by his father who, as a carpenter and welder, was always creating things. He is inspired by the act of creation and is always experimenting in his art. His contemporary work is cutting-edge and truly challenges ideas of what Native American jewelry is. A graduate of the Institute of American Indian Arts, Casuse now teaches at the Poeh Arts Center in Pojoaque, New Mexico, educating a new generation of Native jewelers. He has taken home honors from many prestigious shows, including Best of Classification at Santa Fe Indian Market and Heard Museum Market. Originally from Twin Lakes, New Mexico, Casuse now lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

November 11–December 9, 2016

Demian DinéYazhi’

Demian DinéYazhi’

Demian DinéYazhi’ is a Portland-based transdisciplinary artist born to the clans Naasht’ézhí Tábąąhá (Zuni Clan Water’s Edge) and Tódích’íí’nii (Bitter Water) of the Diné (Navajo). His work is best understood through the lens of curatorial inquiry, zine production, street interventions, education, workshops, and art production. Demian’s artwork and writing is an evolving inquiry into Radical Indigenous Queer Feminist ideology and has been exhibited and published nationally and internationally. He received his BFA in Intermedia Arts from PNCA, where he received the Intermedia Department Award for his thesis exhibition “Bury My Art at Wounded Knee: Blood & Guts” in the Art School Industrial Complex. He is the founder and director of the artist/activist initiative, Radical Indigenous Survivance & Empowerment (RISE), which is dedicated to the education, perseverance, and evolution of Indigenous art and culture. DinéYazhi’ is the recipient of grants from Evergreen State College (2014), Portland Institute of Contemporary Art (PICA) (2014), and Art Matters Foundation (2015).

Cannupa Hanska Luger

Cannupa Hanska Luger

Cannupa Hanska Luger comes from Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara, Lakota, Austrian, and Norwegian descent. Luger’s unique, ceramic­centric, but ultimately multidisciplinary work tells provocative stories of complex Indigenous identities coming up against 21st century imperatives, mediation, and destructivity. Creating socially-conscious work that hybridizes his identity as an American Indian in tandem with global issues, Luger continues to use art as a catalyst, inviting the public to challenge expectations and misinterpretations imposed upon Indigenous peoples by the colonial social structures that have been historically catered to by Indigenous artists. Luger was the 2015 Rasmuson Foundation Artist-in-Residence and the recipient of the 2015 NCECA Multicultural Fellowship Award.

Liselotte Erdrich

Liselotte Erdrich

Liselotte Erdrich (Turtle Mountain Chippewa) left a 30-year Indian health and education job to pursue a longstanding interest in tribal history and the old Anishinaabe art form of birchbark pictography, “our original writing.” Erdrich stayed with her grandfather, Patrick Au-nish-e-nau-bay Gourneau, while she was in her teens. He made catlinite pipes, hand drums, war clubs, and other wonder objects. He had a prayer bone containing all kinds of seeds and a peace pipe handed down in his family for generations, along with pictographic items. Erdrich was influenced by her grandfather’s fortitude, selflessness, and artistic practices, which ranged widely. Those items were stolen after he died so Erdrich aims to continue the traditions and re-construct what was lost.

Her birchbark pieces were exhibited at Plains Art Museum and at Lewis & Clark State Park, where she was an artist-in-residence. In addition to being a visual artist, Erdrich has written fiction, essays, and children’s books illustrated by Native artists Julie Buffalohead and Lisa Fifield. She has won numerous writing awards including International Reading Association Children’s Choice and Teachers’s Choice Awards and Carter G. Woodson Medal from the National Council on the Social Studies.

October 7–November 4, 2016

Erin Gingrich

Erin Gingrich

Erin Gingrich

Erin Gingrich (Nome Eskimo Community) is an Alaska Native artist whose sculptures and mask forms are composed of wood, paint, and beads. This combination of artistic skills and elements comes from the diverse cultural and environmental influences that surround her. Because of the wealth of artistic, cultural and natural environments that she grew up in, she fostered an interest in both science and art. The particular boreal, coastal, and tundra ecosystems of Alaska, and the relationships between humans and wildlife are examined through the sculptural and mask forms that portray animals, plants, and natural resources that are vital to subsistence living and arctic life. These portrayals aim to represent these important natural resources as they are seen to Alaskan Native peoples, that these resources are gifts. This collection of influences, experiences, and beliefs all aided Erin in the development of her artistic style and skills.

After graduating from Interior Distance Education of Alaska in 2008, Gingrich attended the University of Alaska Fairbanks from where she graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in 2014 with concentration in Native art and painting. She now resides in Anchorage Alaska and where she continues to carve, paint, draw, and bead from her small home studio.

Nakkita Trimble

Nakkita Trimble

Nakkita Trimble

Nakkita Trimble, Nakkita Trimblehl waý, ii Algaxhl Gwilks-ḵ’alt’amtkwhl wam aluugigadiý. Ksim Ganada ńiiý, ii Gingolx wil ẃitgwiý. Nisga’ahl nooý, ii Tlingithl nigwoodiý. Rose (Gurney) hl wahl agwii-nits’iits’iý, ii Christopher Trimblehl wahl agwii-niye’eý.

My name is Nakkita Trimble. My Nisga’a name is Speaking Through Art. I am from Wilps Axdii Wil Luugooda, The House that is Never Empty. I am Frog clan and maternally from Gingolx, British Columbia. Maternally I am Nisga’a, and Paternally I am Tlingit. My great grandparent’s names are Rose (Gurney) and Christopher Trimble. My great grandparents were one of two of the last arranged marriages from my village. I am a descendant of a royal bloodline and my goal is to re-connect the history of this bloodline, as it is being lost.

Christopher’s mother, Ellen Jane Trimble, was a Tlingit Wolf. Nakkita Trimble states, “Through my ancestors I am re-connecting the Nisga’a and Tlingit marital and family ties. I am currently trying to find which village Ellen’s family came from. My family tree and connection to identity are the seeds of the work I create.”

September 2–September 30, 2016

Jason Garcia

Jason Garcia, photograph courtesy artist

Jason Garcia

Jason Garcia (Okuu Pín-Turtle Mountain) uses his artwork to document the ever-changing cultural landscape of his home of Santa Clara Pueblo, New Mexico. Tewa cultural ceremonies, traditions, and stories, as well as 21st century popular culture, comic books, and technology, influence Garcia’s art.

Using traditional materials and traditional Pueblo pottery techniques, along with various printmaking techniques, including lithography, serigraphy, and intaglio etching, Garcia feels that it is important to keep alive the ceramic traditions that have been passed down to him since time immemorial. Garcia feels that these materials and techniques connect him to his ancestral past and landscape, but also connects him and his future generations to their Tewa cultural traditions. The printmaking media is another way of creating and teaching these stories and traditions to a greater audience.

Garcia received his BFA from the University of New Mexico and MFA in Printmaking at the University of Wisconsin.

Gerry Quotskuyva

Gerry Quotskuyva, photograph courtesy artist

Gerry Quotskuyva

Gerry Quotskuyva (Hopi) is a member of the Bear Strap Clan from the Second Mesa Village of Shungopavi in Northern Arizona. He currently resides in Rimrock, AZ, where he maintains a studio. His remarkable style has been nationally recognized in various media including public television, newspaper articles and books including “Art of the Hopi,” by Jerry and Lois Jacka, “Katsina,” by Zena Pearlstone, and “Ancestral Echoes,” a ten-year retrospective. Some of his pieces were selected for Art Market posters including the Hopi Tu-Tsootsvolla in Sedona, the Hopi Carver’s Show at the Heard Museum, and the Winter Market at the National Museum of the American Indian.

Quotskuyva has garnered numerous awards for his carvings and paintings from Art Markets including the Heard Museum, Arizona State Museum, Museum of Northern Arizona, Sharlot Hall Museum, and Eiteljorg Museum in Indianapolis, as well as Santa Fe Indian Market. His work has been showcased at group exhibits including “From the Earth” at the American Indian Contemporary Arts Gallery in San Francisco, “Art of the Mesas” at Tubac Center of the Arts, and “Contemporary Katsina’s”, a nine-month exhibit at UCLA’s Fowler Museum in Los Angeles.
Tohono Chul Park in Tucson hosted Quotskuyva’s first, and highly successful, one-man exhibit titled “Contemporary Fragments” in the Spring of 2002. His second solo exhibit, “Ancestral Echoes,” ran from September thru October 2004 at Nichols Gallery on the Pitzer College campus in Claremont, CA.

In the Fall of 2009, Quotskuyva was commissioned by the Heard Museum to create ten Sunface Katsina sculptures that were presented as prizes at the Cancer Treatment Centers of American annual Tennis Championships in Surprise, AZ. He is currently working on a permanent collection for Xavier University in Cincinnati, OH, that consists of over fifty pieces reflecting the diversity of his sculptural styles.

September 5–October 7, 2016

Luke Parnell

Luke Parnell, photograph courtesy artist

Luke Parnell

Luke Parnell is a Vancouver-based artist and a member of the Nisga’a and Haida nations and he is both traditionally and classically trained with a bachelor’s degree in Sculpture and installation, a Master’s degree of applied arts, and an apprenticeship with Master Tsimsian Carver Henry Green. This diverse training and epistemology has influenced his practice. “The Burden,” the artwork to be completed in Santa Fe, utilizes this training to address issues of ownership and responsibility as an Indigenous artist. Parnell creates art works that honor the tradition of Northwest Coast art but are not devoid of contemporary meaning.

March 23–April 25, 2016

Rory Wakemup

Rory Wakemup (Minnesota Chippewa Tribe) is a Master of Fine Arts graduate from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2015. He received his Master of Arts at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2014. He received his Bachelor of Fine Arts from the Institute of American Indian Arts Santa Fe New Mexico in 2010.

Wakemup is a multidisciplinary artist whose work turns the script of cultural appropriation on its head. He has morphed his experience in Indian ceremonies with his studio art practice and has become a conduit between conceptual ideas and the materials at hand. Wakemup enjoys playing with the grey areas of what is appropriate in today’s society. He was a co-founder of the Humble Experiment, Independent Student Gallery in Santa Fe, New Mexico and was on a panel for Native Underground, sponsored by the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture.

Recently, Wakemup was awarded the “Chazen Museum Prize” over 80 other applicants in the UW Madison MFA program for his MFA show “Kill the Idiot Save the Fan” and was featured on Wisconsin Public Televisions “Wisconsin Life”. Wakemup was featured on the front page of the Wisconsin State Journal and had the cover article on the “Sundays Best” section Journal and a plethora of other accolades acquired from his student work as a Master of Fine Arts.

Natalie Ball

Natalie Ball (Modoc and Klamath Tribes) was born and raised in Portland, Oregon. She has a BA in Ethnic Studies from the University of Oregon and she furthered her education in New Zealand at Massey University where she attained her MA in Maori Visual Arts. Ball currently resides with her three children on the Klamath Tribes’ former reservation.

Ball is an indigenous artist who examines internal and external discourses that shape Indian identity through contemporary art. She believes historical discourses of Native Americans have constructed a limited and inconsistent visual archive that currently misrepresents our past experiences and misinforms current expectations. She excavates hidden histories, and dominant narratives to deconstruct them through a theoretical framework of auto-ethnography. Her goal is to move “Indian” outside of governing discourses in order to rebuild a new visual genealogy that refuses to line-up with the many constructed existences of Native Americans.

Because auto-ethnography refers to the self, Ball’s identity as a descendent of African slaves, an English US soldier, and as a great great granddaughter of Kientpaush, also known as Captain Jack who led Modoc resistance during the Modoc War of 1872, informs her work. Within the thematic focus of her work and her descendancy, it is here where her artistic approach and interest lies. Her work is always in discussion with racial narratives critical to understanding both the self and the nation and necessarily, our shared experiences and histories.

February 19–March 18, 2016

Jonathan Thunder

Jonathan Thunder

Jonathan Thunder

Jonathan Thunder (Red Lake Ojibwe) is a painter and digital media artist currently residing in Duluth, Minnesota. He attended the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe and received a BFA in Visual Effects and Motion Graphics from the Art Institutes International Minnesota. His work has been featured in many state, regional, and national exhibitions, as well as in local and international publications.

Jonathan’s paintings explore personal themes of identity, life transitions, internal dialogue, and self-transformation. He depicts expressive characters whose emotions and thoughts manifest viscerally in their physical form. The bodies of his subjects often appear fragmented, animalistic, or partially obscured. His art acts as the scrapbook recording an evolving identity. Through his subjects, Jonathan can exaggerate the villains and heroes that make up his self-image. These paintings are self-portraits by nature, but also an act of releasing an image into the world.

Royce Manuel and Debbie Manuel

Royce Manuel ( Ak-Mierl Aw-Thum, Salt River Pima- Maricopa Indian Community) and Debbie Manuel, MSW (Diné).

Royce and Debbie Manuel

Royce and Debbie Manuel

In 2006, Royce and Debbie joined together in their life’s journey. Together, both families have shared many celebrations of life and have grown to respect each other’s cultural lifestyles.

Royce, a 22-year Veteran Retired Firefighter, provides cultural presentations, art demonstrations and remains active throughout his community in Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community and throughout the state.

Together, the Manuels bridge art and science, using traditional knowledge about plants and animals, woodworking skills, and physics to create functional bows and arrows. An additional recent endeavor for the couple has been reviving a near-lost traditional Aw-Thum Kiaho (burden basket).

January 15–February 12, 2016

Joe Feddersen

Joe Feddersen (Colville Confederated Tribes) grounds his vision in Plateau traditional crafts and culture—the fish trap, the blanket or the twined basket, portraying a contemporary cultural landscape. Speaking of the land through a merging of traditional basket patterns and contemporary iconography, Joe works in printmaking, twined baskets, and glass. With degrees in printmaking from the University of Washington (BFA) and the University of Wisconsin, Madison (MFA), the printed image has always been an important means of expression.

Joe is a member of the Colville Confederated Tribes from the heritage of Okanagan and Arrow Lakes, Faculty Emeritus Professor at The Evergreen State College, and a professional artist. His works are collected by major institutes across the country including the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC, the Whitney Museum in New York, Eiteljorg Museum, Indianapolis, Seattle Art Museum, Portland Art Museum, Museum of Glass in Tacoma, Craft Museum at Portland, OR, and the Haley Ford Museum, Salem.

Joe’s work is represented in a number of books including Mixed Blessings by Lucy Lippard, Manifestations, by the Institute of American Indian Arts, Santa Fe, NM, and Changing Hands, Museum of Art Design, NY. A monogram Joe Feddersen/Vital Signs is part of the Jacob Lawrence book series from the University of Washington Press. Upon retirement he returned home to the reservation and now resides and works in Omak, WA, on the Colville Confederation Tribal Reservation.

Drew Michael

Drew Michael (Yup‘ik and Inupiaq) was born in Bethel, Alaska. He and his twin brother grew up in Eagle River, Alaska.

Michael enrolled in a carving class with Bob Shaw and Joe Senungetuk in 1997, during which he learned some of the basics of history, usage of tools, and wood working techniques. Shortly after, he took a job with the Alaska Native Heritage Center and was able to enroll in carving classes provided through the high school program. He also had the great opportunity of working with Kathleen Carlo early in his career. She helped him expand his use of tools and break out of the traditional style of mask making.

While he was learning and practicing his craft, he was searching for his own style and niche in the carving world by studying the masters. He looked for the craftsmanship displayed in the final pieces and spent many hours looking at a piece and thinking about the design and process it took to create the piece. He took those thoughts and applied them to his own work, learning how to manipulate his work into what it is today through the process of trial and error.

Michael’s current focus is to look back at how masks were used for healing and telling stories of things unseen. The creation of these masks shares different healing practices from the Yup‘ik people and energy release within the Chakra spaces in the human body, incorporating religious icons of the Roman Catholic and Orthodox Churches. Each has information to help people find healing. The artist hopes to encourage people to find healing in ways that are about finding balance. He has used these healing practices to find healing in his own life.

November 6–December 5, 2015

Gerald Clarke Jr.

Gerald Clarke Jr. is a member of the Cahuilla Band of Indians located 40 miles southwest of Palm Springs, California. He currently lives on his family’s ranch on the reservation and has served as Vice Chairman on the Tribal Council in the past.

Gerald is currently the Visual Arts Department Chair of Idyllwild Arts Academy and teaches classes in Sculpture and Painting. Previously, Gerald served as an Assistant Professor of Art at East Central University in Ada, Oklahoma.

Clarke explains, “I have experienced much of what is good and bad about contemporary Native existence. The fact that I am still here is both a miracle and a blessing.”

In addition to his teaching duties, he has exhibited his work at a variety of venues throughout the country and abroad. In 1997, he was included in the 7th Native American Fine Arts Invitational at the Heard Museum in Phoenix, Arizona. Then, in 2007, Gerald was awarded an Eiteljorg Museum Fellowship for Native American Fine Art.

James Luna

James Luna is an internationally-recognized multimedia and performance artist. Of Pooyoukitchum, Ipi, and Mexican-American descent, Luna lives on the La Jolla Indian Reservation located in North County San Diego, CA. He holds a BFA from the University of California, Irvine, an MS in Counseling from San Diego State University, and was awarded an Honorary Doctor of Humanities from the Institute of American Indian Arts in 2012. His installations and performance artworks address social themes from his perspective as a citizen of a Native nation on racially charged global issues.

Photographs of his 1987 work “Artifact Piece,” are reproduced in many art historical texts and helped create a significant shift in museum art practices and Native performance art. Luna has performed and exhibited his artwork at numerous locations, including The Whitney Museum of American Art and Museum of Modern Art in New York, National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution, the 2005 Venice Biennale, Getty Center, and many other institutions throughout Canada and the world.

October 1—October 30, 2015

Ed Archie NoiseCat

Ed Archie NoiseCat (Shuswap/St’itLimx, Salish), graduated from Emily Carr College of Art and Design with honors in 1986. He was hired right out of art school by Tyler Graphics in Mount Kisco, New York. While at Tyler Graphics, NoiseCat worked with some of the “blue chip” artists of the day: Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Motherwell, David Hockney, and Frank Stella to name a
few.

From the summer of 1987 to the spring of 1990, NoiseCat was a Master Printmaker with Rutgers University, Solo Press in SoHo, Bob Blackburn’s Printmaking Workshop in New York, and Fox Graphics in Boston. Since then, NoiseCat has been a student of many sculptural mediums and materials including bronze, glass, steel, and many types of indigenous wood. NoiseCat has had the good fortune of working with and learning from some of the best Indigenous carvers around the Pacific Rim and throughout “Indian” Country.

NoiseCat artworks have been collected by the National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution, the Heard Museum in Phoenix, Arizona, and The Museum of Contemporary Native Art in Santa Fe. The Kamloops Art Gallery was the first art museum to take notice of NoiseCat and therefore houses several important early NoiseCat pieces. NoiseCat artworks reside in major private collections in Philadelphia, New York, Boston, Melbourne, Vancouver, and elsewhere. His first “Best of Show” award came from the Indian Art Northwest Native Art Market, Portland OR, in 1998. He won the same award at the Autry Museum in Los Angeles in 2008 and the Best of Show at the Heard Museum Guild Native Art Market, 2010.

NoiseCat Studios/House of Swasulayas is a professional sculpture studio located in Shelton, Washington. The studio specializes in monumental art pieces for corporate, private and tribal clients.

Dyani White Hawk

Dyani White Hawk currently resides in Shakopee, Minnesota. She is Sicangu Lakota, an enrolled member of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe. White Hawk earned a MFA in 2011 from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and BFA in 2008 from the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico. From 2011-2015 she served as Gallery Director and Curator of the All My Relations Gallery in Minneapolis, Minnesota. In March 2015, White Hawk transitioned into a full-time studio practice.

White Hawk has been exhibited throughout the U.S. as well as Italy and Russia. She is a recipient of the 2014 Joan Mitchell Foundation Painters and Sculptors Grant, 2013/14 McKnight Visual Artist Fellowship, and 2012 Southwestern Association of Indian Arts Discovery Fellowship.  White Hawk is an award-winning artist earning Best of Division and first place prizes at the 2013 and 2012 Santa Fe Indian Art Market and Best of Classification at the Santa Fe Indian Art Market in 2011. She has participated in cultural arts residency exchanges in South Africa, Botswana, and Australia.

Her work is included in the collections of the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian, Tweed Museum of Art, Akta Lakota Museum, the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Wisconsin Union Art Collection and the Robert Penn Collection of Contemporary Northern Plains Indian Art of the University of South Dakota, as well as many organizational and private collections. She is represented by Shiprock Santa Fe and the Bockley Gallery in Minneapolis.

August 28–September 25, 2015

Glenda Mckay

Glenda Mckay (Ingalik-Athabascan), from the Cook Inlet region, plays a major role in the making of her traditional art and dolls using indigenous materials such as ivory, bone, feathers, moose, deer, walrus, whale baleen, and sealskin—adorned with intricate sewing, and beading. The youngest of four, McKay was born in Alaska in 1958. At five years old, her grandmother, mother and aunts taught her how to forage for food: hunting, snaring rabbits, birds, and other small animals;  along with digging roots, greens, and picking berries in season. Her family made the tools, snares, fishnets, and hooks from what they found. They brain-tanned and smoked the hides and fish skins to make warm clothing.

McKay continues to do things the old way. She uses her grandmother’s mukluk pattern, and the intricate stitches she learned from her mother are put to use in each doll she makes. In 2001, McKay and her husband moved from the city. For several years they made their living with carvings, beadwork, birch baskets, and spirit masks.

In 2006, Glenda McKay was invited to the Heard Museum Indian Market, where she won her first Ribbon. Her work has been exhibited in the Floral Journey exhibition at Autry National Center Museum in Los Angeles and the Burke Museum in Seattle. McKay has also received fellowships from Cook Inlet Tribal Council in Anchorage, Alaska, and the School for Advanced Research in Santa Fe.

Jonathan Loretto

Jonathan Loretto (Cochiti), born in Santa Fe, New Mexico, is a descendant of Walatowa through his father and Ko’tyit through his mother. Raised on and off Native reservations, his practice in the arts started at a young age, helping his siblings with their ongoing art projects, such as beading, jewelry, and sculpture. Most of that time learning was focused on getting ready for art shows, gallery openings, and pow-wows.

His jewelry skills were passed down by his brother Philip Loretto, who in his own right is an accomplished jeweler with work in the Lourve, Paris. As a jeweler, Jonathan has worked for well-established companies such as Fairchild’s & Co., Nancy Brown, Marc Howard Goldsmith, and Bagley and Hotchkiss—and he also worked on Ralph Lauren’s concho belt collection. While largely self-taught as a claywork artist, Jonathan was inspired by his mother Snowflake Flower’s storytellers and figurines to create a new form of storytellers—kinetic clay bobbleheads.

Through his life’s journey, he has gone to school at the Institute of American Indian Arts for photography and the Southwestern Indian Polytechnical Institute for cooking. He has won a number of ribbons at the annual Santa Fe Indian Market, and he has been an artist fellow and artist-in-residence at the School for Advanced Research, the Wheelwright Museum, and the Vermont Studio Center. Most of his work has been sold through the Case Trading Post at the Wheelwright Museum, and he now shows at True West Gallery in downtown Santa Fe. He has also taught jewelry design and inlay at Hui No’ Eau Visual Arts Center in Makawao in Mani, Hawaii.

Lara Evans

Lara Evans

(Cherokee)

Associate Dean
Academics
P (505) 424-2389
E levans@iaia.edu

Biography

Lara M. Evans is an artist, scholar, curator, and an enrolled member of the Cherokee Nation. She earned her PhD in art history at the University of New Mexico in 2005, specialization within Native American art history is contemporary art. Dr. Evans joined the Museum Studies department at IAIA in 2012 after eight years as faculty at The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington. Since 2015, Dr. Evans has also been Program Director for the IAIA Artist-in-Residence Program (A-i-R), which brings 12-14 Native American artists to campus for month-long residency sessions each year. Dr. Evans’ curatorial projects at the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Art have included Now is the Time: Investigating Native Histories and Visions of the Future (2017) and War Department: Selections from MoCNA’s Permanent Collection (2015–2016).

About IAIA

The Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) is the only four-year degree fine arts institution in the nation devoted to contemporary Native American and Alaska Native arts.

Offering undergraduate degrees in Studio Arts, Cinematic Arts and Technology, Creative Writing, Museum Studies and Indigenous Liberal Studies, and graduate degrees in Creative Writing, IAIA has graduated more than 3,800 students, and welcomes students from the 567 federally-recognized tribes and non-Native Americans looking to obtain a world-class arts education. In any given year, as many as 112 tribes are represented on campus, with about 20 percent of its student body non-Native American, adding to the vibrant cultural mix of IAIA’s diverse and welcoming students, faculty and staff.

Subscribe to IAIA’s Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from IAIA.

Thank you for subscribing to our newsletter.