Exhibitions

The IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (MoCNA) is the country’s only museum for exhibiting, collecting and interpreting the most progressive work of contemporary Native artists.

MoCNA is dedicated solely to advancing the scholarship, discourse and interpretation of contemporary Native art for regional, national and international audiences. As such, it stewards the National Collection of Contemporary Native Art, 7,500 artworks in all media created in 1962 or later. MoCNA is at the forefront of contemporary Native art presentation and strives to be flexible, foresighted and risk-taking in its exhibitions and programs. MoCNA is located in the heart of downtown Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Current, upcoming, and past exhibitions are listed on this page.

Current and Upcoming Exhibitions

Current and upcoming exhibitions at the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (MoCNA).

Without Boundaries: Visual Conversations

February 16July 29

Without Boundaries is an exhibition that grew out of a series of Curated Conversations led by guest curator and artist Sonya Kelliher-Combs at the Anchorage Museum, Anchorage, Alaska. The exhibition features Indigenous leaders in the arts and the work of contemporary artists whose work encourages social action.

Action/Abstraction Redefined

July 28, 2017July 7, 2019

Action Abstraction Redefined features paintings and works on paper from the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (MoCNA) permanent collection created in the 1960s and 1970s. The artists in this exhibition challenged stereotypical expectations of Indian art by experimenting with American modern art movements such as Abstract Expressionism, Color Field and Hard-edge Painting combined with art influences from their own cultural heritage.

Rolande Souliere: Form and Content

January 9, 2018January 27, 2019

Through the use of Ojibway, Cree, and Inuit syllabics, Souliere utilizes aspects of this writing system to engage in ideas about space, color, form, symbolism, surface movement, and language. Her new mural project is an exploration into the parallels and the multifaceted ways in which simple geometric building blocks such as chevrons, circles, and rectangles have a profound affinity with Indigenous language, culture, and abstraction in Western art.

Art & Activism: Selections from The Harjo Family Collection

February 9July 31

This exhibition highlights works from The Harjo Family Collection. The major art collection was recently donated to the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts and contains about sixty artworks. These works were purchased or gifted to Suzan Shown Harjo (Cheyenne/Hodulgee Muscogee), an important American Indian activist, lobbyist, policy maker, and 2011 recipient of an IAIA Honorary Doctorate.

CineDOOM: Narratives of Native Film and Beyond

June 4October 29

MoCNA is pleased to present six innovative films made by Southwestern based Native American directors and their teams of writers, producers, editors, and actors.

Past Exhibitions

A listing of past exhibitions at the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts.

IAIA 2018 BFA Exhibition—Breaking Ground

February 9May 12

The Institute of America Indian Arts’s 2018 BFA thesis exhibition at the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts showcases the diversity of work created by the artists trained at IAIA.

The Abundant North: Alaska Native Films of Influence

January 8June 3

MoCNA is please to collaborate with the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) in the presentation of films that reflect both home-grown cinematic influences in Alaskan film and works generated by UAF students and alumni.

Brian Jungen, 27th Street, 2016 Nike Air Jordan insoles, laces, 153.5 x 136 x 7"

Connective Tissue: New Approaches to Fiber in Contemporary Native Art

July 7, 2017January 21, 2018

Connective Tissue: New Approaches to Fiber in Contemporary Native Art features contemporary Native American artists who integrate various forms of fiber art media and methods to achieve their visions and to make their statements. They share an interest in the materiality and technique of fiber art.

American Traditional War Songs: The Ethnopoetic Videos of Sky Hopinka

July 3, 2017December 23, 2017

MoCNA is pleased to present the digital works of filmmaker Sky Hopinka (Ho-Chunk Nation of Wisconsin/Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians). Hopinka’s work is both multifaceted conceptually and formally, with involved tiers of images and narratives. Beautiful and mysterious, thick with color and gesture, his films are filled with notions and confluences around tribal identity, language and land.

Desert ArtLAB: Ecologies of Resistance

May 19, 2017January 28, 2018

Desert ArtLAB is an interdisciplinary art collaborative, established by museum curator and educator April Bojorquez (Chicana/Rarámuri) and artist and educator Matthew Garcia (Chicano). The collaborative reconceptualizes desert/dryland ecologies not as post-apocalyptic growth of wasteland, but as an ecological opportunity.

New Acquisitions: 2011–2017

May 5, 2017January 21, 2018

New Acquisitions: 2011–2017 highlights newly acquired work over the past six years from MoCNA’s Permanent Collection and demonstrates the museum’s commitment to collect works that are visionary and a testament to IAIA’s innovative spirit. The selected artworks complement each other through aesthetic, color, and form, but also share an expansive vision collectively.

IAIA 2017 BFA Exhibition—IN CONCLUSION

April 7, 2017May 12, 2017

The IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (MoCNA) presents IN CONCLUSION, a BFA exhibition showcasing the graduating class of 2016–2017. IAIA continually inspires the next generation of Indigenous and non-Indigenous artists alike.

2017 Social Engagement Art Residency Shorts

February 15, 2017June 30, 2017

IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (MoCNA) created a 10-day Social Engagement Art residency program which offers four Native artists a year an opportunity to create socially engaged art. The museum serves as a catalyst for artists to generate community dialogue and dynamic experiences. The MoCNA Social Engagement Residency realizes socially engaged art projects that celebrate and engage the vibrant community that IAIA, MoCNA, and Santa Fe offers. The museum looks to enable contemporary Native artists to negotiate and position…

Daniel McCoy: The Ceaseless Quest for Utopia

January 27, 2017January 1, 2018

Daniel McCoy’s art addresses contemporary Native American issues, past triumphs, current disasters, and is inspired by underground comics, album covers, as well as Oklahoma flat style painting. His new mural project for IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (MoCNA) further develops themes and characters of his previous works which are based in Native culture and Americana. The mural will also have an underlying message on environmental issues. McCoy (Muscogee Creek/Citizen Band Potawatomi) was born in Tulsa, OK. He received his…

Now is the Time: Investigating Native Histories and Visions of the Future

January 27, 2017April 16, 2017

Recent works by IAIA Artist-in-Residence (A-i-R) artists explore current themes and trends in contemporary Native American art, including Indigenous science fiction and visionary Native histories. Several of the works are inspired by Native abstract symbolism of the past and their futuristic aesthetics, while others respond to popular culture and investigate the role of Star Wars™ in American Indian art and culture. Performance art installations question the “art for art’s sake” concept of many past Western art movements, and instead, promote the…

Athena LaTocha: Inside the Forces of Nature

January 20, 2017May 13, 2017

This solo exhibition showcases recent drawings and paintings by artist Athena LaTocha (Hunkpapa Lakota and Ojibwe) based on her recent experiences in Santa Fe. Her contemporary landscape paintings focus on the dynamic gesture and atmosphere that recall nature’s powerful forces. LaTocha’s unorthodox approach to the subject ‘landscape’ involves personal memories and the use of unusual tools, techniques, and materials, resulting in intense, haunting images of nature scenes on a monumental scale. Her working method is based on indigenous perceptions of…

New Impressions: Experiments in Contemporary Native American Printmaking

January 20, 2017June 15, 2017

Organized by the International Print Center New York, New Impressions: Experiments in Contemporary Native American Printmaking showcases over forty prints by twelve contemporary Native American printmakers. Grounding their work in the images, textures, and experiences that shaped their lives, artists layer old and new, past and present to explore how the attitudes that informed the racial policies and practices of the last centuries continue to resonate in popular culture today. Among the artists are Lynne Allen (Hunkpapa Lakota descent), Rick…

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2016 SWAIA’s Indian Market Moving Image Classification X Winners

October 24, 2016February 14, 2017

This film program features SWAIA’s 2016 Indian Market Moving Image Classification X winners. Awards for Narrative Short, Documentary Short, Animation Short, Experimental Short, Music Video, and Youth Winners, recognize dedication and skill in working with new media and innovative art forms while retaining a commitment to traditional creation and technique. Award-winning films will be shown in the Helen Hardin Media Gallery at the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (MoCNA). Total running time of this film program is 56 minutes.…

Excerpt from Moving Mountains

August 19, 2016October 23, 2016

Selected scenes from Moving Mountains (20 minutes), an upcoming feature documentary about The Repellent Fence, a two-mile long ephemeral monument created by Indigenous art collective Postcommodity that spanned the United States and Mexico border for three days in October, 2015. Download and view the .

Rick Bartow: Things You Know But Cannot Explain—A Retrospective Exhibition

August 19, 2016December 31, 2016

Organized by the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon, the exhibition represents 40 years of work by the Native American artist. More than 120 paintings, drawings, sculptures, and prints will be on view in “Rick Bartow: Things You Know But Cannot Explain,” a major retrospective exhibition organized by the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA) at the University of Oregon. From Nothing Coyote Creates Himself, 2004Wood, metal, 41 x 84 x 16 inchesCourtesy of the artist…

2016 IAIA BFA Exhibition

April 7, 2016May 14, 2016

The IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (MoCNA) is proud to present the IAIA annual BFA graduating student exhibition. This year’s exhibition celebrates the class of 2015–2016 and showcases a diversity of styles that combine traditional skill with contemporary vision. These artists represent the future of Native art, charting a path for others to follow. Like all BFA exhibitions, there is a wealth of style and media on view. The wide-range of works selected by an esteemed jury include photography,…

IAIA Student Filmmaker Showcase

February 15, 2016July 31, 2016

Now in its third year, IAIA’s Department of Cinematic Arts is encouraging, training, and inspiring a new generation of Native filmmakers by providing them with the tools and a curriculum founded on the principles of meaningful storytelling, technical proficiency, ethical behavior, and a knowledge of cinematic history and concepts. IAIA is taking a leadership role in addressing the critical lack of American Indian representation in film, television and the media by offering a BFA degree in film, and is the…

Lloyd Kiva New: Art

January 22, 2016December 31, 2016

Lloyd Kiva New: Art features nearly thirty paintings by Cherokee artist Lloyd Henri “Kiva” New (1916–2002) completed between 1938–1995. New is best known for fashion design and the development of innovative concepts in cultural based education for Native people. Extravagant handbags, dresses, and modern design are calling cards of New’s art career, but his two-dimensional works are not as well known. The paintings, from his personal collection and rarely shown in a museum or gallery, exemplify how Lloyd “Kiva” New…

A Portrait of Pitseolak by Annie Pootoogook, pencil crayon, ink, Inuit, Cape Dorset (2003/2004)

Akunnittinni: A Kinngait Family Portrait—Pitseolak Ashoona | Napachie Pootoogook | Annie Pootoogook

January 22, 2016December 31, 2016

Loosely translated, the Inuktitut word Akunnittinni means “between us.” This exhibition chronicles a visual dialogue between an Inuk grandmother, mother, and daughter—Pitseolak Ashoona (1904-1983), Napachie Pootoogook (1938-2002), and Annie Pootoogook (1969- ). Their artworks provide a personal and cultural history of three generations of Inuit women whose art practices included autobiographic narratives and have chronicled intimate and sometimes harsh memories and historically resonant moments. The prints and drawings on view also include sardonic references to pop culture that now infuses…

Eliza Naranjo Morse

Forward: Eliza Naranjo Morse

January 22, 2016December 31, 2016

Perhaps we yearn to make our lives good and find balance because even when we feel completely challenged there is the unrelenting proof in each of us that we are survivors, that we are the result of our ancestors histories and that eventually we will become ancestors. This collection of work interprets facets of this thought. About the Artist Eliza Naranjo Morse is Santa Clara Pueblo, and lives in Espanola, New Mexico. Born in 1980, she comes from two large…

Lloyd Kiva New: Art, Design, and Influence

January 22, 2016July 31, 2016

Lloyd Kiva New: Art, Design, and Influence celebrates the work of Cherokee artist and educator Lloyd Henri “Kiva” New (1916-2002). This exhibition observes New’s 100th birthday and draws on three major themes of his legacy, each tied to his innovative concepts in Native art and culturally-based education. Lloyd Kiva New: Art, Design, and Influence includes paintings by New from his personal collection, completed between 1938-1995, many never before shown in a museum or gallery. Lloyd Kiva New: Art, Design, and…

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2015 SWAIA’s Indian Market Moving Image Classification X Winners

October 23, 2015February 14, 2016

This film program features SWAIA’s Indian Market Moving Image Classification X winners. Awards for Animation Short, Documentary Short, Experimental Short, Narrative Short, Music Video, and Youth Short, recognize the artist’s dedication and skill in working with new media and innovative art forms while retaining a commitment to traditional creation and technique. 2015 Class X Winners Animated Short How the Bear Got a Short Tail, 2015 (9:30 mins) Director: Elizabeth Day (Leech Lake Ojibwe) Written by Anna Gibbs, produced by Heid E. Erdich for…

Meryl McMaster: Wanderings

August 21, 2015December 31, 2015

Meryl McMaster’s work demonstrates a continually evolving exploration of the artist’s own relationship to cultural and familial heritage within the larger framework of historical and contemporary Indigenous identities. As a person with both Indigenous and European familial lineages, McMaster treats identity subjectively, as something that is never complete, always in process, but invariably shaped by both internal and external factors and actions. Wanderings, a new body of photo-based work, represents a new progression in her photo-based practice. While previous bodies…

An Evening Redness in the West

August 21, 2015December 31, 2015

This group exhibition takes the idea of the Apocalypse and reimagines it. The fiction novel by Santa Fe author Cormac McCarthy, The Blood Meridian, which traces the violent journey of a ragtag group of men across the American West and Mexico, inspired the exhibition’s title. The end of the world, implied by the word Apocalypse, also carries with it the promise of a new one. Ornately beaded gas masks, other objects formed from the detritus of a collapsed society, intricate…

Eve-Lauryn LaFountain: Waabanishimo (She Dances Till Daylight)

August 20, 2015December 31, 2015

LaFountain’s work plays in the intersections of photography, film, and sound. In several of her works she creates her own ceremonies in order to understand traditions. She asks: “How do I, a contemporary mixed blood woman, hold onto heritage, learn my tribal language and connect with the ways my ancestors lived? I don’t have buffalo hides to make a tipi, but, as a filmmaker, I do have film. My fire is the flicker of a projector shining through the layers…

Fred Treas, Crown Dancer, Tempera on board, 30” x 22”, 1964, MoCNA Collection A-78, Photograph by Jason S. Ordaz

Visions and Visionaries

August 20, 2015July 6, 2017

IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts’s (MoCNA) new permanent collection gallery highlights the exhibition Visions and Visionaries. Drawing from the strength and diversity of the permanent collection, the works enable us to see IAIA’s history and the world through different eyes, as well as highlight the role of visionaries who forged new paths that we continue to follow. Collections tell particular stories—in this case the development of Native art in the American southwest in the 1960s and its evolution into…

LaDonna Harris: Indian 101

August 20, 2015October 20, 2015

LaDonna Harris: Indian 101 (63 minutes) chronicles the life of Comanche activist and national civil rights leader LaDonna Harris and the role that she has played in Native and mainstream American history since the 1960s. Harris’s activism began in Oklahoma, fighting segregation and assisting grassroots Native and women’s groups. She continued her work in Washington, D.C., where she helped to introduce landmark programs and legislation including tribal land return claims, improving education and healthcare for Native Americans, ending job discrimination…

The Truth About Stories: Julie Buffalohead

May 15, 2015July 31, 2015

This exhibition is a collection of recent works on paper by Minneapolis-based artist Julie Buffalohead. Known for her deft use of allegory and archetype, Buffalohead’s narrative drawings are dreamscapes consisting of a rich cast of characters, trickster coyotes and rabbits as well as turtles, deer, birds, and rodents. In her works animals often take the form of humans and vice-versa. This fictional world is a means to engage with the very real ills of contemporary society such as the rise…

You Are On Indian Land

You Are On Indian Land

April 23, 2015July 31, 2015

The exhibition You Are On Indian Land presents the work of leading contemporary American Indian and First Nations artists from across the North American continent. The participating artists actively engage the notion of pop-culture, misappropriation, and representation in their work. This multi-site exhibition premiered at Radiator Gallery in New York on April 17, 2015 featuring the work of Nicholas Galanin, Edgar Heap of Birds, Postcommodity, and Marcus Amerman. You Are On Indian Land Here at the IAIA Museum of Contemporary…

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IAIA 2015 BFA Exhibition—Future Tellers

April 11, 2015May 16, 2015

The IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts is proud to present the IAIA annual BFA graduating student exhibition. The exhibition celebrates the class of 2014–2015 and showcases a diversity of styles that combine traditional skill with contemporary vision. The artists represent the future of Native art, charting a path for others to follow. Like all BFA exhibitions, there is a wealth of style and media on view. The wide-range of works selected by an esteemed jury include photography, painting, sculpture,…

Turtle Island Rising: Past and Future Programs from imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival

February 13, 2015August 7, 2015

IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (MoCNA) and imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival, bring the first of two short film programs that, through an artistic lens, span the histories and envision new horizons of the First Peoples of Turtle Island, a term for North America used in oral storytelling traditions by Northeastern Woodland tribes. The program will present origin, myth, fable and allegorical themes of history using the canons of Indigenous filmmaking both traditional and contemporary, featuring artists from the…

Star Wallowing Bull: Mechanistic Renderings

January 24, 2015July 31, 2015

Featuring recent paintings and drawings, and a selection of new works, this exhibition will reveal Wallowing Bull’s evolving aesthetic, one that reflects a growing mechanical sensibility of both form and style. Wallowing Bull is recognized for his signature color pencil drawings on paper that investigate the intersection of Native American and contemporary pop culture. Stylistically abstract and semi-autobiographical, these intricately crafted compositions are defined by a dense network of line and form that animate the shallow picture plane. Recently, the…

Chris Pappan: Account Past Due, Ledger Art and Beyond

January 24, 2015March 31, 2015

This exhibition, a mix of new and recent works, includes drawings and paintings in Chris Pappan’s signature style of contemporary ledger art. The mid 1800s saw the unprecedented expansion of the American empire, and with it, catastrophic changes for Indigenous people. Beginning in the 1860s, paper was introduced to the plains via ledger books and was quickly adapted for the visual recording of the tumultuous times of the people of the plains. Pappan continues the tradition by portraying a skewed…

Dark Light: The Ceramics of Christine Nofchissey McHorse

January 24, 2015July 31, 2015

Dark Light is the first traveling exhibition of this groundbreaking Navajo (Diné) artist. McHorse, a first-generation potter, is considered among the most innovative artists working today creating vessel-based art that is undecorated and abstract, with formal qualities indebted more to modern sculpture than to Southwestern culture. With the urge to transgress and blur the boundaries between pottery and sculpture, in 1996 McHorse decided to leave utility and tradition behind and pursue shapes that had been haunting her for some time.…

War Department: Selections from MoCNA’s Permanent Collection

War Department: Selections from MoCNA’s Permanent Collection

January 24, 2015December 31, 2015

All of the works in this exhibition have something to do with war, but depict very little gore or physical violence. The armed conflicts referenced in these artworks span 500 years, from the Spanish and Pueblo conquest, to World War II, Vietnam, Wounded Knee, the Mohawk and Oka Crisis, and present-day conflicts. This selection of works from the permanent collection examines the nuanced depictions of war and civil unrest in contemporary Native art. We tend to think of war as…

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2014 SWAIA’s Indian Market Moving Images Classification X Winners

November 15, 2014February 12, 2015

This film program features SWAIA’s Indian Market Moving Image Classification X winners. This category is one of the most recent classifications to be added to the juried market. These awards recognize an artist’s dedication and skill in working with new media and innovative art forms while retaining a commitment to traditional creation and technique. 2014 Class X Winners Animated Short Escape to the Moon, 2014 (12:28) Director: Felicia Nez (Navajo) A lonely robot hopes to find his true love by…

Mario Martinez—The Desert Never Left “The City”

August 22, 2014December 31, 2014

Mario Martinez’s artwork always pays reverence to nature through the influences derived from his deeply rooted Yaqui cultural background and allure to Western Modernism. The visual density of his paintings in his solo exhibition The Desert Never Left “The City” reflect upon the magic and power encoded within the spiritual and natural eco-systems conceptualized from an ancient pre-Christian Yaqui belief system. In doing so, Martinez vibrantly conflates his enduring Sonoran desert memory and Yaqui culture organically and abstractly through his…

Courtney M. Leonard—Breach: Log 14

August 22, 2014December 31, 2014

"Breach" is an exploration of historical ties to water and whale; imposed law; and a current relationship of material sustainability. Navigation lies within visual translation, acceptance, and pursuit of process. Charting exists as a logging of record; documentation and mapping of each point where the surface breaks. BREACH: LOG 14 catalogs the expedition, encounters, and experiences that occurred from January–August 2014. About the Artist Courtney Michele Leonard is an artist and filmmaker from the Shinnecock Nation of Long Island, New York.…

Ric Gendron—Rattlebone

August 22, 2014December 31, 2014

MoCNA hosts a traveling exhibition of the paintings and related works of Spokane artist Ric Gendron (pronounced zhan-drea), a dual-enrolled member of the Arrow Lakes Band of Confederated Tribes of the Colville and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla. Gendron is little-known established artist, and the exhibition and monograph Rattlebone feature more that 30 years of his vibrantly expressionistic and lyrical paintings and prints. His paintings and mixed-media works illustrate the rich and diverse visual vocabulary of traditional Upper Columbia…

Da–Ka–Xeen Mehner—Saligaaw (It Is Loud-Voiced)

August 21, 2014December 31, 2014

Alaskan artist Da-ka-xeen Mehner celebrates the lasting and profound relationship between Tlingit language and song in the exhibition Saligaaw (it is loud-voiced). Like many Native American families, Mehner’s grandmother and grandfather were from a generation who were punished for speaking their language. Inspired by a collective tenacity of maintaining traditional language and song, Mehner’s installation combines hand-stretched drums and video projection as a means to keep tradition vitally intact. About the Artist Da-ka-xeen Mehner(Tlingit/N’ishga) uses the tools of family ancestry…

Andrea Geyer: Spiral Lands/Chapter 2

August 21, 2014December 31, 2014

Andrea Geyer digs into the complexities of narrative and imagery to consider how they become solidified into history and art. Her series Spiral Lands concerns history’s tendency to repeat itself. Created at a time when American exceptionalism was coloring the invasion of Iraq, for Geyer, the rhetoric justifying the invasion was reminiscent of that of manifest destiny. A work in three parts, Spiral Lands / Chapter 2, replicates an educational setting: slides of Chaco Canyon and Bandelier National Monument click…

Bert & Weiwei: Time 2014

August 21, 2014November 14, 2014

A documentary film directed by Daniel Hyde and Blackhorse Lowe. Part of the TIME project, which documents the site-specific land art project by artists Ai Weiwei and Bert Benally. A new media installation as part of Pull of the Moon, a site-specific land art project by artists Ai Weiwei and Bert Benally is featured in the Honor Gallery. Pull of the Moon is part of Navajo TIME (Temporary Installations Made for the Environment), a unique partnership between New Mexico Arts…

Native American Short Films Presented By Sundance

May 24, 2014July 31, 2014

Featuring films from Sundance Institute’s Native American and Indigenous Program Sikumi (On the Ice) An Iñuit hunter takes his dog team out on the frozen Arctic Ocean in search of seals and inadvertently becomes a witness to a murder. Director: Andrew Okpeaha MacLean (Inupiaq) (15 mins.) Nikamowin (Song) Deconstructing and reconstructing Cree narrative, this film experiments with language to create a linguistic soundscape. Director: Kevin Lee Burton (Swampy Cree) (12 mins.) Shimásání When Mary Jane finds a world geography book that…

Brandywine Workshop Collection

May 24, 2014July 31, 2014

The Brandywine Workshop in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania was founded to support the creation, documentation and preservation of a legacy of culturally diverse American art and ensuring the participation of multi-ethnic artists in the field of fine art printmaking and related media technologies. The organization recently donated a collection of works by Indigenous artists to the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Natives Arts National Collection upholding the vision to establish satellite collections at public institutions across the country for preservation and exhibition. Image:…

Bon À Tirer Prints From The MoCNA Collection

May 24, 2014July 31, 2014

Bon à Tirer, or more commonly seen written as “B.A.T.” on a fine art print, is a French term meaning good to pull. Dating back to the late 1800s, a French master printmaking atelier (studio) required a signature and the initials B.A.T. from the artist for whom the atelier was creating an edition, usually a lithograph or etching. An artist was required to sign B.A.T. along with their signature on the print as an indication of the artist’s approval for…

Shan Goshorn—We Hold These Truths

May 24, 2014July 31, 2014

We Hold These Truths features contemporary baskets made from paper that have been inspired by traditional techniques, shapes, patterns and functions of Cherokee baskets. Shan Goshorn examines and manipulates the material and authority of paper (and the written word) as a weapon aimed against Native Americans in the form of treaties, ancestry rolls, laws, restrictions, land allotment and more. By weaving baskets from a variety of reproduced historical documents, Goshorn’s work offers an opportunity to re-interpret penned history from an…

IAIA 2014 BFA Exhibition

April 11, 2014May 18, 2014

The IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts is proud to present the annual Institute of American Indian Arts BFA student exhibition. This year’s BFA exhibition celebrates the class of 2013/14 and showcases a diversity of styles that combine traditional skill and contemporary vision. The exhibition features a wide range of works selected by a jury and includes photography, painting, sculpture, installation and jewelry. Participating Artists Shaun Beyale Frederick Big Lake Rylan Bourke Heidi Brandow Deborah Corbett Stephanie De La Rosa Madge…

ARTiculations in Print—Kenojuak Ashevak (1927–2013)

January 25, 2014July 31, 2014

Internationally renowned graphic artist Kenojuak Ashevak (b. 1927) passed away in 2013 at the age of 85. While we mourn the loss of one of the most significant Inuit artists of the modern era, she leaves behind an unparalleled artistic legacy in prints and drawings created over 50 years of uninterrupted production. The selection of works from the Edward J. Guarino Collection highlight the diversity of Ashevak’s print practices and the development of her iconic style over a long and…

ARTiculations in Print—Prints from the Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts

January 25, 2014July 31, 2014

A selection of prints from the Crow’s Shadow Press signifies the ever-growing portfolio of prints produced over a 20-year period since the founding of the Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts located in Pendleton, Oregon. The exhibition encompasses the work of many outstanding artists of diverse backgrounds and media, and includes Rick Bartow, Wendy Red Star, John Feodorov, Lillian Pitt, Truman Lowe, Corwin Clairmont, Marie Watt, and Whitney Minthorn, among others working in collaboration with Crow’s Shadow Master Printer Frank…

Sallyann Paschall and Alex J. Peña: The Place Between

January 25, 2014March 31, 2014

The two-person exhibition The Place Between draws from and expands upon the conceptual basis of the original multiple supported by the printmaking process and potential for creative manipulation to interpret a sense of place. Paschall’s approach utilizes a base of intaglio ImagOn and lithographic prints that include crystal forms found in the geologic minerals of Smoky Mountain and Oklahoma ore deposits. Peña likewise uses a variety of printmaking media and focuses on his conceptual notions of finding place in an…

Tony Tiger: Full Consciousness of Being

January 25, 2014May 11, 2014

Tony Tiger’s work speaks to a philosophy of contemporary Native soul. His work honors the truth and spirit of Native peoples’ endurance. In the mixed-media exhibition Full Consciousness of Being, Tiger’s context for expression arises from the totality of his personal observations related to intercultural experiences, while drawing on the critical influence Native people have actively contributed to historically and contemporaneously. About the artist Tony Tiger, an enrolled member of the Sac and Fox Tribe of Oklahoma and also of…

ARTiculations in Print—David Sloan T’ah Aniiłtso Yéé’bii’ Neiikai (Endangered Species)

January 25, 2014July 31, 2014

David Sloan’s installation of monoprints include silkscreened images of endangered species with their Diné names over lithograph reproductions of old 1970’s Navajo Times newspaper ads. Sloan’s conscious intentions compare and contrast eco-philosophies of American consumer culture with traditional Diné world perspective. The disparity of the animal images on top of the propaganda style-like advertisements promoting consumerism to the Diné people back in the 1960’s and 70’s is meant to question the value of assimilation of Indigenous people and their knowledge…

ARTiculations In Print—John Hitchcock: Traces Of The Plains

January 25, 2014July 31, 2014

Traces of the Plains consists of works on paper. A multimedia installation of printed matter and video, the exhibition references the trauma of war and fragility of life. Artist John Hitchcock sets familiar images of U.S. military weaponry against unfamiliar mythological and hybrid creatures originating from the Wichita Mountains in western Oklahoma to allegorically explore the notion of assimilation and control. About the artist John Hitchcock uses the print medium with its long history of social and political commentary to…

Changing Hands: Art Without Reservation 3/Contemporary Native North American Art from the Northeast and Southeast—Selected Works

August 15, 2013December 31, 2013

Changing Hands: Art Without Reservation 3/Contemporary Native North American Art from the Northeast and Southeast, Selected Works concludes a cycle of landmark exhibitions conceived and organized to present a comprehensive and in-depth cross section of innovative and groundbreaking work by contemporary Indigenous artists. These creative individuals express a new vitality and spirit of experimentation in Native art, often embracing tradition while moving forward and looking towards the future. The original exhibition, comprising more than 100 works by 85 Native artists…

Steven J. Yazzie: The Mountain

August 15, 2013December 31, 2013

Steven J. Yazzie’s work is about land, as a place of personal reflection, a framework for Indigenous cultural relevance, and a point of reference to changing politics related to urbanization. For the exhibition The Mountain, Yazzie recognizes place as an entity with multidimensional interpretations and has become an essential location for his creative investigations as a source of history, knowledge and power. The new installation includes sculpture, painting, digital photographic prints, and a multichannel video to build experiential entry points…

Jacob Meders: Divided Lines

August 15, 2013December 31, 2013

In the exhibition Divided Lines, artist Jacob Meders examines the complex misrepresentations of Indigenous peoples in North American artistic depictions prevalent in 15th and 16th century European society. By incorporating an aesthetic that emulates historic woodcuts, Meders’ panoramic installation toys with the idea of assimilation, reimagining figures with a likeness to Indigenous and western European cultures as one body. Divided Lines challenges the perceived superiority of European identity and society shaped from a Western artistic tradition that has been maintained…

Cannupa Hanska Luger Stereotype: Misconceptions of the Native American

August 15, 2013December 31, 2013

“Native American” is an umbrella term for the Indigenous population of North America. This term, being so broad, has allowed for many external interpretations, from anthropologists to Hollywood directors, to define who Native Americans are. The reality of the matter is that the continent of North America is vast, with environmental and cultural complexity that ranges from arctic tundra to semi-tropic wetlands. These lands contain culturally rich and autonomous societies that bare very little resemblance to one another over such…

Rosalie Favell—Facing the Camera: The Santa Fe Suite

May 25, 2013July 31, 2013

Métis artist Rosalie Favell’s series, Facing the Camera (2008–present), is a growing suite of photographic portraiture that documents individuals from a growing Indigenous arts community. Through these images, Favell sees the photograph as a performance space where identity is constantly worked and reworked, represented, and perhaps hidden. Facing The Camera: The “Santa Fe Suite” was realized through her residency with the Santa Fe Art Institute (SFAI) in August 2012. At this time, she photographed artists and the arts community at…

Stands with a Fist: Contemporary Native Women Artists

May 25, 2013July 31, 2013

Stands with a Fist is a multi-disciplinary art exhibition that is a unique platform for cultivating, celebrating, and declaring a continual presence of visual expression created by contemporary Native women artists. The exhibition demonstrates the ways that women boldly fit into, redefine, or turn upside down the usual categories of art and art-making, while re-interpreting and drawing from their rich cultural heritage. Collectively, their work expresses a unique Indigenous relationship to the land, contemporary worldview, and sense of obligation to their culture.

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